29394http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-CEDBED-forest-tundra-grasslands-1.png#cedbed#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/natural-history-museum-aarhus/The Natural History Museum (Danish: Naturhistorisk Museum) in Aarhus is a Danish museum specializing in natural history. The Natural History Museum is an independent institution financed with contributions from the Ministry of Culture, Aarhus Municipality, Aarhus University and revenues from visitors. The museum is situated in the Aarhus University campus in the district Midtbyen, but also operates a field laboratory and education centre, the Molslaboratoriet, in Mols Bjerge National […]PHYLO: THE TRADING CARD GAME | The PHYLO(MON) PROJECTNatural History Museum, AarhusHome Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1723/42428318682_750f40f076_z_d.jpg<p><b>FACT:</b> The game is based on the exhibition ”Back to the Ice Age” at the Natural History Museum in Aarhus. During the Ice Age, Denmark was partially covered by glaciers.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>foresttundragrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_History_Museum,_Aarhus">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_History_Museum,_Aarhus<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29395http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-DDD8CC-forest-tundra-grasslands-1.png#ddd8cc#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/mammoth-steppe/During the Last Glacial Maximum, the mammoth steppe was the Earth’s most extensive biome. It spanned from Spain eastwards across Eurasia to Canada and from the arctic islands southwards to China.[2][3][4][5][6] It had a cold, dry climate,[7][6] the vegetation was dominated by palatable high-productivity grasses, herbs and willow shrubs,[3][6][8]and the animal biomass was dominated by the bison, horse, and the woolly mammoth.[7] This ecosystem covered wide areas of the northern part of […]Mammoth SteppeMammoth SteppeHome Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1734/27608144067_cd94777633_z_d.jpg<p><b>FACT:</b> South of the ice was the Mammoth steppe, which stretched from Western Europe, over Siberia, all the way to North America; 10,000 km long and 2,000 km wide.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>foresttundragrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth_steppe">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth_steppe<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29369http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C4E3ED-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png#c4e3ed#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/european-saber-toothed-cat/Homotherium (also known as the scimitar-toothed cat or scimitar cat)[2] is an extinctgenus of machairodontine saber-toothed cats,[3] often termed scimitar-toothed cats, that inhabited North America, South America, Eurasia, and Africa during the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs (4 mya – 12,000 years ago), existing for approximately 4 million years.[1][4] It first became extinct in Africa some 1.5 million years ago. In Eurasia it survived until about 30,000 years ago.[5] In South America it is only known from a few remains in the northern […]smaller-12European Saber-Toothed CatEuropean Saber-Toothed CatHomotherium latidens<img alt="Scale 7" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/7.png" />7<img alt="Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/carnivore3.png" />https://farm1.staticflickr.com/894/28606691628_79af32861b_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 8<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 2. The card may be put next to all sizes of herbivores.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The European saber-toothed cats are often wrongly called “saber-toothed tigers”. Saber-toothed cats belong to their own genus.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandsforest<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homotherium">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homotherium<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29373http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-DDB8B8-tundra-grasslands-grasslands-1.png#ddb8b8#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/woolly-mammoth/The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) is an extinct species of mammoththat lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with Mammuthus subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The woolly mammoth diverged from the steppe mammoth about 400,000 years ago in East Asia. Its closest extant relative is the Asian elephant. The appearance and behaviour of this species […]Woolly MammothWoolly MammothMammuthus primigenius<img alt="Scale 9" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/9.png" />9<img alt="Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/herbivore2.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1760/27608146497_7fbb538432_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 4<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 1<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The mammoth’s tusks grow throughout life of the mammoth. By counting the growth rings at the thickest point, one can find out how old the mammoth was. They grew about 10 to 20 cm each year.</p> cold, cool<0>cold<1>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>tundragrasslandsgrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_mammoth">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_mammoth<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/4454738/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/4454738/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29365http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C6CFEF-grasslands-grasslands-tundra-1.png#c6cfef#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/woolly-rhino/The woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) is an extinct species of rhinocerosthat was common throughout Europe and northern Asia[2] during the Pleistoceneepoch and survived the last glacial period. The genus name Coelodonta means “cavity tooth”. The woolly rhinoceros was a member of the Pleistocene megafauna. The appearance of woolly rhinos is known from mummified individuals from Siberia as well as cave paintings.[4] An adult woolly rhinoceros was typically around 3 to 3.8 […]Woolly RhinoWoolly RhinoCoelodonta antiquitatis<img alt="Scale 9" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/9.png" />9<img alt="Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/herbivore2.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1749/41576320995_eef2291410_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 4<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 1</p> <p><b>FACT:</b> When horns from woolly rhinos were found in Russia during the 19th century, many believed they were the claws of giant birds, because they were found apart from the rest of the body.</p> cold, cool<0>cold<1>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandstundra<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_rhinoceros">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woolly_rhinoceros<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/4452721/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/4452721/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29407http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C7D6C0-tundra-grasslands-grasslands-1.png#c7d6c0#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/arctic-poppy/Papaver radicatum is a species of poppy known by the common names Arctic poppy, rooted poppy, and yellow poppy. It is circumpolar in distribution and grows in arctic and alpine zones in Europe, North America, and Asia.[2][3] It grows at a latitude of 83°40’N on Kaffeklubben Island,[4] making it one of the northernmost plants in the world. It appears on the Coat […]Arctic PoppyArctic PoppyPapaver radicatum<img alt="Scale 5" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/5.png" />5<img alt="Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/photosynthetic1.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1755/42428317712_286f0e8ec8_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with plantae" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/plantae/">Plantae</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with angiosperms" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/angiosperms/">Angiosperms</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with eudicots" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/eudicots/">Eudicots</a>2<p><b>FACT:</b> The flowers of the Arctic poppy fol- lows the sun’s movement across the sky. In this way it increases the temperature inside the flower creating an attractive microclimate for insects seeking warmth.</p> cold, cool<0>cold<1>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>tundragrasslandsgrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papaver_radicatum">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papaver_radicatum<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/463762/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/463762/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29406http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-DDC7C7-grasslands-grasslands-grasslands-1.png#ddc7c7#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/american-lion/The American lion (Panthera leo atrox)[2][3][4][note 1] – also known as the North American cave lion[3] – is an extinct subspecies of lion that lived in North America during the Pleistocene epoch (340,000 to 11,000 years ago).[5]Genetic analysis has revealed that it was the sister lineage to the Eurasian cave lion.[3] It was part of the Pleistocene megafauna, a wide variety of large mammals that lived at the time. The majority of American lion fossils have come from […]American LionAmerican LionPanthera atrox<img alt="Scale 8" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/8.png" />8<img alt="Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/carnivore3.png" />https://farm1.staticflickr.com/878/42428317772_aee3ce8950_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 9<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 1. The card may be put next to all sizes of herbivores.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The American lion was much larger than the present African lion. It is related to the Cave lion.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandsgrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_lion">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_lion<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/10462377/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/10462377/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29404http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-CCDBEA-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png#ccdbea#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/dire-wolf/The dire wolf (Canis dirus, “fearsome dog”) is an extinct species of the genus Canis. It is one of the most famous prehistoric carnivores in North America, along with its extinct competitor, the sabre-toothed cat Smilodon fatalis. The dire wolf lived in the Americas during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene epochs (125,000–9,440 years ago). The species was named in 1858, four years after the first specimen had been found. Two subspecies are […]Dire WolfDire WolfCanis dirus<img alt="Scale 8" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/8.png" />8<img alt="Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/carnivore3.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1728/42428317902_34765fa8ce_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 7<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 3. The card may be put next to all sizes of herbivores.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The dire wolf lived in North America og is more closely related to the coyote than to the grey wolf.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandsforest<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dire_wolf">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dire_wolf<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/4444493/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/4444493/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29403http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-EDEDD5-grasslands-grasslands-grasslands-1.png#ededd5#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/yukon-wild-horse/Equus lambei (common names include Yukon horse, and Yukon wild horse[1][7]) is an extinct species of the genus Equus. Equus lambeiranged across North America until approximately 10,000 years ago. Based on recent examinations of the mtDNA of Equus lambei remains, scientists have concluded that E. lambei was probably was much like the extinct Tarpan, also known as the Eurasian wild horse, and the living Przewalski’s Horse.[6][8] A partial carcass of Equus lambei is on display at […]Yukon Wild HorseYukon Wild HorseEquus lambei<img alt="Scale 8" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/8.png" />8<img alt="Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/herbivore2.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1747/42428318082_9141f0231e_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 4<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 3<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The Yukon wild horse was one of the most common animals on eastern part of the Mammoth Steppe. It was a tiny horse, the size of today’s ponies.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandsgrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equus_lambei">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equus_lambei<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/4451981/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/4451981/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29401http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-DBD0E2-0-0-0-1.png#dbd0e2#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/cro-magnon/European early modern humans (EEMH) in the context of the Upper Paleolithic in Europe refers to the early presence of anatomically modern humans in Europe. The term “early modern” is usually taken to include fossils of the Aurignacian, Gravettian, Solutrean and Magdalenian, extending throughout the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), covering the period of roughly 45,000 to 15,000 years ago.[1] The description as “modern” is used as contrasting with […]Cro-MagnonCro-MagnonEvent Card0https://farm1.staticflickr.com/893/42428318172_f686997d80_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> The card may be placed on top of all animal cards. Both cards are discarded right away.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The Cro-Magnon is a collective term for the early humans. They spread from Africa to the Middle East, Australia, Europe, Asia and America. They hunted on the Mammoth steppe.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_early_modern_humans">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_early_modern_humans<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29402http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-F2E9DC-0-0-0-1.png#f2e9dc#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/interglacial-periods/An interglacial period (or alternatively interglacial, interglaciation) is a geological interval of warmer global average temperature lasting thousands of years that separates consecutive glacial periods within an ice age. The current Holocene interglacial began at the end of the Pleistocene, about 11,700 years ago. (From Wikipedia, June 2018)Interglacial PeriodsInterglacial PeriodsEvent Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1733/28606690218_9901be9d23_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> You may perform three extra actions when it is your turn. Remove the card from the table after use.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> During the interglacial periods there were a warmer climate and a richer fauna.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interglacial">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interglacial<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29400http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-EFE7E6-0-0-0-1.png#efe7e6#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/i-dont-think-so-2/I Don’t Think So!I Don’t Think So!Event Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1742/28606690278_0ba27820f8_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> Play this card on your opponent’s turn when they use an event card against you. It stops the effect of their event card. Discard both event cards.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29399http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-D5EAE8-0-0-0-1.png#d5eae8#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/meltwater/Meltwater is water released by the melting of snow or ice, including glacial ice, tabular icebergs and ice shelves over oceans. Meltwater is often found in the ablation zone of glaciers, where the rate of snow cover is reducing. Meltwater can be produced during volcanic eruptions, in a similar way in which the more dangerous lahars form. When meltwater pools on the surface rather than flowing, it forms melt ponds. As the […]MeltwaterMeltwaterEvent Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1753/42428318342_153169c2e8_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> The card can be played in an open space.<br /> No actions are counted, but any adjacent omnivore/ herbivore cards must be moved immediately. Any cards which cannot be moved due to lack of open spaces must be discarded.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> During the warmer periods of the Ice Age, the ice melted and flooded vast areas.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meltwater">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meltwater<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29398http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-D0DFF2-0-0-0-1.png#d0dff2#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/blizzard/A blizzard is a severe snowstorm characterized by strong sustained winds of at least 35 mph (56 km/h) and lasting for a prolonged period of time—typically three hours or more. A ground blizzard is a weather condition where snow is not falling but loose snow on the ground is lifted and blown by strong winds. Blizzards can have an immense size, which can […]BlizzardBlizzardEvent Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1733/27608143927_054b6d260f_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> May be placed on top of all animal cards not living in arctic (or “cold”) climate. Remove both cards from the table. The animal card returns to its player’s hand and the event card is discarded.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> Not all animals of the Ice Age could endure very low temperatures.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blizzard">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blizzard<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29397http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-DAE1EA-0-0-0-1.png#dae1ea#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/give-birth-to-many-cubs/Give Birth To Many CubsGive Birth To Many CubsEvent Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1724/42428318462_31763ab6a3_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> This card allows the player (who has it) to play any of their cards upside down as a reindeer.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> The cold climate of the Ice Age was tough on all species. But the reindeers did well, as they produced large amounts of offspring.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29396http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-E1EDE9-0-0-0-1.png#e1ede9#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/neanderthals/Neanderthals (UK: /niˈændərˌtɑːl/, also US: /neɪ-, –ˈɑːn-, –ˌtɔːl, –ˌθɔːl/;[4] also Neanderthal Man, taxonomically Homo neanderthalensis or Homo sapiens neanderthalensis[5]) were archaic humans who lived in Eurasia during roughly 250,000 to 40,000 years ago.[6][7][8][9] They seem to have appeared in Europe and expanded into Southwest and Central Asia. They are known from numerous fossils, as well as stone tool assemblages. Almost all of those younger than 160,000 years are of the so-called Mousterian […]NeanderthalsNeanderthalsEvent Card0https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1740/27608144117_0ca9baafdb_z_d.jpg<p><b>EFFECT:</b> May be placed on top of an animal card. Rem- ove both cards from the table. The animal card returns to its player’s hand and the event card is discarded.<br /> <b>FACT:</b> During the last interglacial, about 100,000 years ago, Denmark was inhabited by Neanderthals. They were dependent on the Ice Age animals for prey.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neanderthal<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29405http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-EDEDD5-grasslands-forest-grasslands-1.png#ededd5#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/american-mastidon/Mastodons (Greek: μαστός “breast” and ὀδούς, “tooth”) are any species of extinct proboscideans in the genus Mammut (family Mammutidae), distantly related to elephants, that inhabited North and Central America during the late Miocene or late Pliocene up to their extinction at the end of the Pleistocene10,000 to 11,000 years ago.[1] Mastodons lived in herds and were predominantly forest dwelling animals that fed on a mixed diet obtained by browsing and grazing with a seasonal preference for […]American MastidonAmerican MastidonMammut americanum<img alt="Scale 9" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/9.png" />9<img alt="Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/herbivore2.png" />https://farm1.staticflickr.com/877/28606689948_b61bb56ef5_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with animalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/animalia/">Animalia</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with chordata" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/chordata/">Chordata</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with mammalia" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/mammalia/">Mammalia</a>EXTINCT | 5<p><b>PLAY:</b> Move of 1<br /> <b>FACT:</b> Despite that mastodons and mammoths look somewhat alike, they are not closely related. The mastodon lived in spruce woodlands, valleys and swamps, where it ate leaves from shrubs and trees, and conifer twigs.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsforestgrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mastodon">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mastodon<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/4454807/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/4454807/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29393http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-E3D3E5-grasslands-grasslands-tundra-1.png#e3d3e5#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/purple-saxifrage/Saxifraga oppositifolia, the purple saxifrage or purple mountain saxifrage,[1] is a species of edible plant that is very common all over the high Arctic and also some high mountainous areas further south, including northern Britain, the Alps and the Rocky Mountains. It is even known to grow on Kaffeklubben Island in north Greenland,[2] at 83°40’N, the most northerly plant locality in the world. It grows in all kinds of cold temperate to arctic […]Purple SaxifragePurple SaxifrageSaxifraga oppositifolia<img alt="Scale 5" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/5.png" />5<img alt="Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/photosynthetic1.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1732/27608144227_9447314ff8_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with plantae" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/plantae/">Plantae</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with angiosperms" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/angiosperms/">Angiosperms</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with eudicots" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/eudicots/">Eudicots</a>2<p><b>FACT:</b> It is a low-growing and mat-forming perennial plant. The flowers have a purple colour and are edible.</p> cold, cool<0>cold<1>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandstundra<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxifraga_oppositifolia">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saxifraga_oppositifolia<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/583337/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/583337/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29392http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-DBD6BA-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png#dbd6ba#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/goldenrod/Solidago virgaurea (European goldenrod or woundwort) is an herbaceous perennial plant of the family Asteraceae. It is widespread across most of Europe as well as North Africa and northern, central, and southwestern Asia (China, Russia, India, Turkey, Kazakhstan, etc.).[2][3][4] It is grown as a garden flower with many different cultivars. It flowers profusely in late summer. Solidago virgaurea is a perennial herb up to […]GoldenrodGoldenrodSolidago virgaurea<img alt="Scale 6" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/6.png" />6<img alt="Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/photosynthetic1.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1753/42428318802_56c7ed9e68_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with plantae" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/plantae/">Plantae</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with angiosperms" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/angiosperms/">Angiosperms</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with eudicots" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/eudicots/">Eudicots</a>2<p><b>FACT:</b> This plant contains substances that makes one highly diuretic when ingested.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>grasslandsgrasslandsforest<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidago_virgaurea">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidago_virgaurea<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/6185350/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/6185350/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29391http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C3E2DF-forest-forest-grasslands-1.png#c3e2df#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/norway-spruce/Picea abies, the Norway spruce,[3] is a species of spruce native to Northern, Central and Eastern Europe.[4] It has branchlets that typically hang downwards, and the largest cones of any spruce, 9–17 cm (3 1⁄2–6 3⁄4 in) long. It is very closely related to the Siberian spruce(Picea obovata), which replaces it east of the Ural Mountains, and with which it hybridises freely. The Norway spruce is widely planted for its wood, and […]Norway SpruceNorway SprucePicea abies<img alt="Scale 9" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/9.png" />9<img alt="Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1" src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/num/photosynthetic1.png" />https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1750/27608144437_d29279ae1a_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with plantae" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/plantae/">Plantae</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with pinophyta" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/pinophyta/">Pinophyta</a>, <a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with pinopsida-2" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/pinopsida-2/">Pinopsida</a>3<p><b>FACT:</b> During the Ice Age, few Norway spruces grew in ice-free areas. After the retreat of the ice, the trees spread to the milder tundra landscape.</p> cool<0>cool <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>ThøgersenThøgersenhttp://www.thogersen-stouby.dk/ <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>forestforestgrasslands<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picea_abies">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Picea_abies<li><a title="go to Encyclopedia of Life" class="permalink eol-link" href="http://eol.org/pages/1061648/overview">EOL</a><li>http://eol.org/pages/1061648/overview<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>