29294http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C9C7E5-0-0-0-1.png#c9c7e5#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/annie-easley-2/Annie J. Easley (April 23, 1933 – June 25, 2011) was an African-American computer scientist, mathematician, and rocket scientist.[1] She worked for the Lewis Research Center (now Glenn Research Center) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). She was a leading member of the […]PHYLO: THE TRADING CARD GAME | The PHYLO(MON) PROJECTAnnie Easley1933-2011, USA0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2871/33938792010_0c260be1fd_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>5<p>– Was a rocket scientist at NASA (Centaur rocket stage).<br /> – Developed important computer code, that is used in alternative energy, solar, and wind projects.<br /> – Was one of the first African-Americans in her field.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Ping Zhu</em></span><a href="http://www.pingszoo.com">www.pingszoo.com</a></div>Ping Zhuwww.pingszoo.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annie_Easley">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annie_Easley<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29293http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-9FA2CC-0-0-0-1.png#9fa2cc#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/maud-menten-2/Maud Leonora Menten (March 20, 1879 – July 26, 1960) was a Canadian physician-scientist who made significant contributions to enzyme kinetics and histochemistry. Her name is associated with the famous Michaelis–Menten equation in biochemistry. Maud Menten was born in Port Lambton, Ontario and studied medicine at the University of Toronto (B.A. 1904, M.B. 1907, M.D. […]Maud MentenMaud Menten1879-1960, Canada0https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4175/33938792560_98b1bbbc85_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>3<p>– Helped develop the Michaelis-Menten equation in biochemistry.<br /> – Earned a medical degree (one of the first women in Canada) as well as a PhD.<br /> – Had to move to Germany, as at the time, women were not allowed to do research in Canada.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Ping Zhu</em></span><a href="http://www.pingszoo.com">www.pingszoo.com</a></div>Ping Zhuwww.pingszoo.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_Menten">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_Menten<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29292http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-EFEADC-0-0-0-1.png#efeadc#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/caroline-herschel-3/Caroline Lucretia Herschel (16 March 1750 – 9 January 1848) was a German astronomer, whose most significant contributions to astronomy were the discoveries of several comets, including the periodic comet 35P/Herschel-Rigollet, which bears her name.[1] She was the sister of astronomer William Herschel, with whom she worked throughout her career. She was the first woman […]Caroline HerschelCaroline Herschel1750-1848, Germany0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2834/33481208914_130dda16b6_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>3<p>– She discovered 8 comets.<br /> – First woman to be paid by a government for scientific contributions.<br /> – An asteroid, a comet, and a moon crater all bear her name.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Simon Gurr</em></span><a href="http://www.gurrillustration.com">www.gurrillustration.com</a></div>Simon Gurrwww.gurrillustration.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Herschel">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Herschel<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29291http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C4D3D1-0-0-0-1.png#c4d3d1#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/rosalind-franklin-2/Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958[1]) was an English chemist and X-ray crystallographer who made contributions to the understanding of the molecular structures of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), RNA (ribonucleic acid), viruses, coal, and graphite.[2] Although her works on coal and viruses were appreciated in her lifetime, her contributions to the discovery of […]Rosalind FranklinRosalind Franklin1920-1958, England0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2806/33938792340_e643d9cb95_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>4<p>– Made key contributions (which were not acknowledged at the time) to the discovery of the structure of DNA.<br /> – After her death, 2 Nobel prizes were awarded to her collaborators.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Ping Zhu</em></span><a href="http://www.pingszoo.com">www.pingszoo.com</a></div>Ping Zhuwww.pingszoo.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosalind_Franklin">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosalind_Franklin<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29290http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-ACB594-0-0-0-1.png#acb594#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/sophia-kowalevski/Sofia Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya (Russian: Со́фья Васи́льевна Ковале́вская), born Sofia Vasilyevna Korvin-Krukovskaya (1850–1891), was a Russian mathematician who made noteworthy contributions to analysis, partial differential equations and mechanics. She was the first major Russian female mathematician and a pioneer for women in mathematics around the world. She was the first woman appointed to a full professorship […]Sophia KowalevskiSophia Kowalevski1850-1891, Russia0https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4164/33481208804_99d83e89fe_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>4<p>– Did 3 times as much work to become the first European woman to earn a mathematics PhD.<br /> – Taught herself math from textbooks.<br /> – Made important original contributions to differential equations and mechanics.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Simon Gurr</em></span><a href="http://www.gurrillustration.com">www.gurrillustration.com</a></div>Simon Gurrwww.gurrillustration.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sofia_Kovalevskaya">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sofia_Kovalevskaya<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29289http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-F7C3C3-0-0-0-1.png#f7c3c3#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/hedy-lamarr-2/Hedy Lamarr (/ˈhɛdi/; born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler, November 9, 1914 – January 19, 2000)[a] was an Austrian and American film actress and inventor.[1] After an early and brief film career in Czechoslovakia that included the controversial film Ecstasy (1933 – in which Lamarr is very briefly seen swimming in the nude and running naked), she […]Hedy LamarrHedy Lamarr1914-2000, Austria/USA0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2830/34191915661_6e84bdfd33_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>2<p>– Co-invented spread spectrum and frequency hopping technology, which are now used in WiFi, GPS, and more.<br /> – Was a glamorous Hollywood film star; having starred in 30 films.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Ping Zhu</em></span><a href="http://www.pingszoo.com">www.pingszoo.com</a></div>Ping Zhuwww.pingszoo.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedy_Lamarr">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedy_Lamarr<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29288http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-E0D5B5-0-0-0-1.png#e0d5b5#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/maria-sibylla-merian-2/Maria Sibylla Merian (2 April 1647 – 13 January 1717) was a German-born naturalist and scientific illustrator, a descendant of the Frankfurt branch of the Swiss Merian family, founders of one of Europe’s largest publishing houses in the 17th century. Merian received her artistic training from her stepfather, Jacob Marrel, a student of the still life […]Maria Sibylla MerianMaria Sibylla Merian1647-1717, Germany0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2826/33938791840_f92f026882_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>2<p>– First to observe and document the metamorphosis of a butterfly.<br /> – One of the most significant contributors to entomology.<br /> – Was an accomplished botanical artist.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Simon Gurr</em></span><a href="http://www.gurrillustration.com">www.gurrillustration.com</a></div>Simon Gurrwww.gurrillustration.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Sibylla_Merian">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Sibylla_Merian<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29287http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-C3DDA4-0-0-0-1.png#c3dda4#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/alice-ball-2/Alice Augusta Ball (July 24, 1892 – December 31, 1916) was an African American chemist who developed an injectable oil extract that was the most effective treatment for leprosy until the 1940s.[1] She was also the first woman and first African American to graduate from the University of Hawaii with a master’s degree.[2] Early life […]Alice BallAlice Ball1892-1916, USA0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2884/34191916251_4e0348ff65_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>3<p>– First woman and African-American Masters graduate from the University of Hawaii.<br /> – Developed a leprosy treatment that was still in use until the 1940s.<br /> – However, after her death, the president of the university took credit for her treatment.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Shannon Wright</em></span><a href="http://shannon-wright.com">shannon-wright.com</a></div>Shannon Wrightshannon-wright.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Ball">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Ball<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29286http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-E8B9B9-0-0-0-1.png#e8b9b9#212121http://phylogame.org/cards/chien-shiung-wu-2/Chien-Shiung Wu (simplified Chinese: 吴健雄; traditional Chinese: 吳健雄; pinyin: Wú Jiànxióng; May 31, 1912 – February 16, 1997) was a Chinese-American experimental physicist who made significant contributions in the field of nuclear physics. Wu worked on the Manhattan Project, where she helped develop the process for separating uranium metal into uranium-235 and uranium-238 isotopes by gaseous […]Chien-Shiung WuChien-Shiung Wu1912-1997, China/USA0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2855/34191915441_013d28af71_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with scientist" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/scientist/">Scientist</a>4<p>– The “Wu experiment” disproved conservation of parity: thought to be a law of nature.<br /> – Worked on the Manhattan Project, and made significant contributions to radioactivity research.<br /> – Was a fierce advocate of social justice in her later years.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --><span>Graphic by <em>Simon Gurr</em></span><a href="http://www.gurrillustration.com">www.gurrillustration.com</a></div>Simon Gurrwww.gurrillustration.com <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<li><a title="go to Wikipedia" class="permalink wikipedia-link" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chien-Shiung_Wu">Wiki</a><li>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chien-Shiung_Wu<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29277http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-18/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2890/33938789230_90ca707ec7_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>Women are half of the population but hold only about a quarter of the science and engineering jobs in the US. As well, despite women receiving roughly half of the PhDs, they only hold less than a quarter of professorships.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29276http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-17/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2835/33512774903_f7a2b72ddf_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>“I didn’t succumb to the stereotype that science wasn’t for girls.”<br /> <object align="right">~ Sally Ride</object></p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29275http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-16/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4186/33512774533_28baac89ae_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>Although there is still much work to be done, things are better than they used to be. For this, we owe a huge thanks to the trailblazing efforts of many women of STEM.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29274http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-15/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4168/34322891635_bb0a5aecde_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>The Oxford Dictionary defines this as: The practice of making only a perfunctory or symbolic effort to do a particular thing, especially by recruiting a small number of people from under-represented groups in order to give the appearance of sexual or racial equality within a workforce.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29273http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-14/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2860/34322891395_a4a7b56ece_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>Unfortunately, this happens a lot. Said Voltaire of Emilie du Chatelet (physicist and mathematician), “She was a great man whose only fault was being a woman.”</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29272http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-13/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2883/33512774963_6a53ab8350_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>“The main stumbling block in the way of any progress is and always has been unimpeachable tradition.”<br /> <object align="right">~ Chien-Shiung Wu</object></p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29271http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-12/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2863/33512774803_e8987d1c92_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>STEM women’s careers suffer disproportionately from taking family leave. Many fathers do not take paternity leave even where it is available.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29270http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-11/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4187/34322891675_6ff8bc0495_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>Why is it that Marie Curie is almost always the one person that is brought up over and over when talking about women in STEM?</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29268http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-10/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2872/34322891495_5506ea758d_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>Allies, the ones who are actively engaged, are so important.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29267http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-9/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2836/34322891325_2534a8cf1a_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>Congrats! You’ve made a major breakthrough! However, credit is disproportionately given to a male colleague or advisor.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>29266http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/generated-card-images/br-FDD300-0-0-0-1.png#fdd300#fdd300http://phylogame.org/cards/modifier-8/MODIFIERMODIFIER.0https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2808/33512774693_c5b2347fa2_z_d.jpg<a rel="classification" title="View all cards that are classified with modifier-card" href="http://phylogame.org/classification/modifier-card/">Modifier Card</a><p>This phenomenon is complex and involves a variety of unconscious biases, but the general idea is that this describes situations where successful women will undermine her female colleagues.</p> <div class="graphic"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div> <div class="photo"> <!-- <?php echo $type; ?> --></div>000<a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a><a target="_blank" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" title="Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)"><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/by.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nc.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /><img src="http://phylogame.org/wp-content/themes/phylo/img/cc-icons/nd.png" width="12" height="12" class="cc-icon-img" /></a>