Wild Red Raspberry

Rubus idaeus
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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1 POINTS

Fact: Wild red raspberry is a biennial plant-it grows a flowerless stalk one year, which then produces fruit and dies the next year.

cold, cool
Graphic by Elly Knighttwitter.com/ellycknight
Rubus idaeus (raspberry, also called red raspberry or occasionally as European raspberry to distinguish it from other raspberries) is a red-fruited species of Rubus native to Europe and northern Asia and commonly cultivated in other temperate regions.[2][3] A closely related plant in North America, sometimes regarded as the variety Rubus idaeus var. strigosus, is more […] read more

Common Blueberry

Vaccinium myrtilloides
Scale 7 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: Blueberry loves sandy, acidic areas and often grows near conifers because the trees’ fallen needles acidify the soil.

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Graphic by Elly Knighttwitter.com/ellycknight
Vaccinium myrtilloides is a shrub with common names including common blueberry, velvetleaf huckleberry, velvetleaf blueberry, Canadian blueberry, and sourtop blueberry.[2] It is common in much of North America, reported from all 10 Canadian province plus Nunavut and Northwest Territories, as well as from the northeastern and Great Lakes states in the United States. It is […] read more

Paper Birch

Betula papyrifera
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

Fact: Birch is an early successional species, meaning that it is one of the first trees to regrow after a disturbance like wildfire.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Betula papyrifera (paper birch,[3] also known as white birch[3] and canoe birch[3]) is a short lived species of birch native to northern North America. Paper birch is named due to the thin white bark which often peels in paper like layers from the trunk. Paper birch is often one of the first species to colonize […] read more

Baobab Tree

Adansonia digitata
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1

2 POINTS

Fact: During the voyage, the observation of this tree (which can grow to be 6000 years old), is thought to have made Darwin ponder the long timescales in the Earth’s geology.

warm, hot
Adansonia digitata (baobab) is the most widespread of the Adansonia species on the African continent, found in the hot, dry savannahs of sub-Saharan Africa. Common names for the baobab include dead-rat tree (from the appearance of the fruits), monkey-bread tree (the soft, dry fruit is edible), upside-down tree (the sparse branches resemble roots), cream of […] read more

Sicyos villosus

Cucurbitaceae Sicyos villosus
Scale 7 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

2 POINTS

Play: This plant is EXTINCT.
Fact: Darwin’s single dried specimen of Sicyos villosus, collected during the Beagle voyage, appears to be the only piece of evidence that showed this plant ever existed.

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Graphic by Golly Bardgollybard.blogspot.ca
Sicyos is a flowering plant genus of the family Cucurbitaceae. Members of the genus are commonly known as burr cucumbers.[2] (From Wikipedia, August 2015) read more

Galapagos Prickly Pear

Opuntia echios
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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1 POINTS

Fact: This prickly pear is a favourite meal for the Galápagos tortoises. It’s presence is also a selective pressure and has resulted in changes to the tortoise’s shell.

warm, hot
Graphic by Robert Ballwww.robertmball.com/
Opuntia echios is a species of plant in the Cactaceae family. It is endemic to theGalápagos Islands (Ecuador) and is commonly known as the Galápagos prickly pear, but there are five other species of prickly pears that also are endemic to the archipelago (O. galapageia, O. helleri, O. insularis, O. megasperma and O. saxicola). There […] read more