[{"id":"28669","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/seas-rising\/","excerpt":"Sea level rise refers to an increase in the volume of water in the world\u2019s oceans, resulting in an increase in global mean sea level. Sea level rise is usually attributed to global climate change by thermal expansion of the water in the oceans and by melting of Ice sheets and glaciers on land. Melting […]","name-size":"","title":"Seas Rising","title-attr":"Seas Rising","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/691\/32052088562_34a5e82a29_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"","card-text":"

Play:<\/strong> Place this card on any terrestrial SPECIES card.<\/p>\n

Effect:<\/strong> The SPECIES card, as well as any other horizontally adjacent SPECIES cards (that cannot live in the water), are immediately discarded. <\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

Graphic by Dinosaurs Unearthed<\/em><\/span>dinosaursunearthed.com<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Dinosaurs Unearthed","url":"dinosaursunearthed.com"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
<\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Sea_level_rise","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28668","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/ice-age\/","excerpt":"An ice age is a period of long-term reduction in the temperature of Earth‘s surface and atmosphere, resulting in the presence or expansion of continental and polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within a long-term ice age, individual pulses of cold climate are termed “glacial periods” (or alternatively “glacials” or “glaciations” or colloquially as “ice […]","name-size":"","title":"Ice Age","title-attr":"Ice Age","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/276\/32052080902_43a5d153f9_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on any SPECIES card. <\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/strong> The SPECIES card is immediately discarded. Leave the Ice Age card in the space and all adjacent cards are “frozen” (cannont be moved). When your opponent has finished their turn, discard the Ice Age card.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ice_age","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28667","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/sand-storm\/","excerpt":"A dust storm is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions. Dust storms arise when a gust front or other strong wind blows loose sand and dirt from a dry surface. Particles are transported by saltation and suspension, a process that moves soil from one place and deposits it in another. Drylands around […]","name-size":"","title":"Sand Storm","title-attr":"Sand Storm","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/536\/31825103130_97a6f273fc_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on any terrestrial SPECIES card.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/strong> The SPECIES is immediately discarded. In the same action, this EVENT moves onto an adjacent card. A game of rock-paper-scissors determines whether this next SPECIES is also discarded. Repeat until your opponent wins wins at rock-paper-scissors. <\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Dust_storm","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28665","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/volcano-2\/","excerpt":"A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth’s volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its […]","name-size":"","title":"Volcano","title-attr":"Volcano","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/348\/32052094862_058a0db056_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on any SPECIES card.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/strong> The SPECIES card is immediately discarded<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Volcano","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28664","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/time-travel\/","excerpt":"Time travel is the concept of movement (such as by a human) between certain points in time, analogous to movement between different points in space, typically using a hypothetical device known as a time machine, in the form of a vehicle or of a portal connecting distant points in time. Time travel is a recognized […]","name-size":"","title":"Time Travel!","title-attr":"Time Travel!","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/493\/31825110290_9785ee0e75_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Play immediately after an opponent’s EVENT card is played.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/strong> The opponent’s EVENT card is immediately discarded, and its effects are cancelled. The Time Travel card is then also discarded. <\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Time_travel","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28663","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/climate-change-5\/","excerpt":"Climate change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time (i.e., decades to millions of years). Climate change may refer to a change in average weather conditions, or in the time variation of weather around longer-term average conditions (i.e., more or fewer extreme […]","name-size":"","title":"Climate Change","title-attr":"Climate Change","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/330\/31825097270_caee3c9172_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on any SPECIES card.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/strong> The SPECIES is immediately discarded. Leave the Climate Change card in the space. After your opponent has had their turn, any SPECIES that is still adjacent (horizontal and vertical) to this card (as well as this event card) is also discarded. <\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Climate_change","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/collections\/106281","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28662","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-forest-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/mamenchisaurus\/","excerpt":"Mamenchisaurus (\/m\u0251\u02d0\u02c8m\u028cnt\u0283i\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/ mah-mun-chi-sawr-\u0259s,[1] or spelling pronunciation \/m\u0259\u02ccm\u025bnt\u0283i\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/) is a sauropod dinosaur genus including several species, known for their remarkably long necks[2] which made up half the total body length.[3] It is known from numerous species which ranged in time from 160 to 145 million years ago, from the Oxfordian to Tithonian ages of the late […]","name-size":"","title":"Mamenchisaurus","title-attr":"Mamenchisaurus","latin-name":"Mamenchisaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/756\/32082525731_852eb45075_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"5","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Mamenchisaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> Had the longest neck of any creature that lived, stretching to 18 meters. <\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Mamenchisaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/46370693\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28661","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-forest-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/metriacanthosaurus\/","excerpt":"Metriacanthosaurus (meaning “moderately-spined lizard”) is a genus of metriacanthosaurid dinosaur from the upper Oxford Clay of England, dating to the mid-Jurassic Period, about 160 million years ago (lower Oxfordian).   (From Wikipedia: March 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Metriacanthosaurus","title-attr":"Metriacanthosaurus","latin-name":"Metriacanthosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/631\/32162464926_6db59c9859_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Metriacanthosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> Not much is known about this dinosaur, and it has been renamed 3 times since its discovery in 1923.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Metriacanthosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/46328876\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28660","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-forest-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/huayangosaurus\/","excerpt":"Huayangosaurus is a genus of stegosaurian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of China. The name derives from “Huayang” (\u83ef\u967d), an alternate name for Sichuan (the province where it was discovered), and “saurus”, meaning “lizard”. It lived during the Bathonian to Callovian stages, around 165 million years ago, some 20 million years before its famous relative, […]","name-size":"","title":"Huayangosaurus","title-attr":"Huayangosaurus","latin-name":"Huayangosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/699\/32200898185_4b62625c53_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Huayangosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> This dinosaur had teeth in the front of its mouth and was also one of the smallest of the stegosaurus. It fed on ferns, cycads, and conifers. <\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Huayangosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4658073\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28658","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-forest-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/yangchuanosaurus\/","excerpt":"Yangchuanosaurus is an extinct genus of metriacanthosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived in China during the Bathonian and Callovian stages of the Middle Jurassic, and was similar in size and appearance to its North American relative, Allosaurus. It hails from the Upper Shaximiao Formation and was the largest predator in a landscape which included the sauropods […]","name-size":"","title":"Yangchuanosaurus","title-attr":"Yangchuanosaurus","latin-name":"Yangchuanosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/486\/32052163942_0663420ee5_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Yangchuanosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> This dinosaur possessed a tail that made up half of its total length. <\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Yangchuanosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4433967\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28653","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-tundra-tundra-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/monolophosaurus\/","excerpt":"Monolophosaurus (\/\u02ccm\u0252no\u028a\u02ccl\u0252fo\u028a\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/ mon-o-lof-\u0259-sawr-\u0259s;[1] meaning “single-crested lizard”) is a genus of tetanuran theropoddinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Shishugou Formation in what is now Xinjiang, China.[2][3] It was named for the single crest on top of its skull. Monolophosaurus was a mid sized carnosaurian carnivore at about 5 metres long.   (From: Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Monolophosaurus","title-attr":"Monolophosaurus","latin-name":"Monolophosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/472\/32082532981_d98f8a6fdc_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Nonolophosaurus<\/i> <\/p>\n

    Play:<\/strong> The singe crest was hollow with canals that led to a nasal passage. This indicated that it had the ability to produce sound through the crest and to sing or call to a potential mate. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Monolophosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4434307\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28652","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-tundra-tundra-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/stegosaurus\/","excerpt":"Stegosaurus (\/\u02ccst\u025b\u0261\u0259\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/[1]) is a genus of armored dinosaur. Their fossil bones have been found in rocks dated to the Late Jurassicperiod (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian ages), between 155 and 150\u00a0million years ago, in the western United States and Portugal. Several species have been classified in the upper Morrison Formation of the western U.S, though only […]","name-size":"","title":"Stegosaurus","title-attr":"Stegosaurus","latin-name":"Stegosaurus ","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/631\/32052153722_46fdf6ca6e_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Stegosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> When threatened, Stegosaurus would turn its head back to look over its shoulder: this way to better aim the swing of its dangerous tail.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Stegosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/46370922\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28650","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-ocean-ocean-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/shrimp\/","excerpt":"Aeger elegans is a species of fossil prawn from the Solnhofen Plattenkalk.[1]   (From: Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Shrimp","title-attr":"Shrimp","latin-name":"Aeger elegans","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/773\/31390490413_4a5bc7207b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Malacostraca<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Aeger elegant<\/i> had a MOVE of 1. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> This is a species of shrimp that was found in the Solnhofen limestone of Germany. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Aeger_elegans","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/10522327\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28649","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-tundra-tundra-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/scorpionfly\/","excerpt":"Miriholcorpa is an extinct genus of scorpionfly (Mecoptera) from the Middle Jurassic period of China. The type and only species is M. forcipata, described in 2013.   (From: Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Scorpionfly","title-attr":"Scorpionfly","latin-name":"Miriholcorpa forcipata","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/326\/31359378974_b155e9bb14_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Scorpionfly<\/i> had a FLIGHT of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> The Scorpionfly had a general bulb that was enlarged with pincer-like structures, and thought to be used in intrasexual competition with males, and\/or a sexual display to attract females. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Miriholcorpa","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/42386008\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28648","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDC2-forest-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ededc2","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/norfolk-island-pine\/","excerpt":"Araucaria mirabilis is an extinct species of coniferous tree from Patagonia, Argentina. It belongs to the section Bunya (the only living species of which is Araucaria bidwillii from Australia) of the genus Araucaria. A. mirabilis are known from large amounts of very well preserved silicified wood and cones from the Cerro Cuadrado Petrified Forest, including […]","name-size":"","title":"Norfolk Island Pine","title-attr":"Norfolk Island Pine","latin-name":"Araucaria mirabilis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/311\/31359371104_369533d765_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Pinophyta<\/a>, Pinopsida<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Araucarian conifers were dominant during the Jurassic period. They were found in tropical rain forests. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Araucaria_mirabilis","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/39373919\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28647","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-tundra-tundra-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/tuojiangosaurus\/","excerpt":"Tuojiangosaurus (meaning “Tuo River lizard”) is a genus of herbivorous stegosaurid dinosaur from the Late Jurassic Period, recovered from the Upper Shaximiao Formation of what is now Sichuan Province in China.   (From: Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Tuojiangosaurus","title-attr":"Tuojiangosaurus","latin-name":"Tuojiangosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/386\/32052155242_b95281bbf4_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Tuojiangosaurs<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> Fed on low growing ferns and cycads. Had four paired spines at the end of its tail that it used for defense. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Tuojiangosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/13154381\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28646","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-tundra-tundra-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/omeisaurus\/","excerpt":"Omeisaurus (meaning “Omei lizard”) is a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Period (Bathonian–Callovian stage) of what is now China. Its name comes from Mount Emei, where it was discovered in the lower Shaximiao Formation of Sichuan Province. Like other sauropods, Omeisaurus was herbivorous and large. It measured 20.2\u00a0metres (66\u00a0ft) long, and weighed […]","name-size":"","title":"Omeisaurus","title-attr":"Omeisaurus","latin-name":"Omeisaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/553\/32052151202_7d6b4cf29e_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Omeisaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> Predators may have deterred from attacking Omeisaurus, not only because of its huge size, but also because it had a huge bony tail club (and possibly tail spikes). <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Omeisaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4658063\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28645","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-tundra-fresh-water-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/dragonfly-4\/","excerpt":"A dragonfly is an insect belonging to the order Odonata, infraorder Anisoptera (from Greek \u1f04\u03bd\u03b9\u03c3\u03bf\u03c2 anisos “uneven” and \u03c0\u03c4\u03b5\u03c1\u03cc\u03bd pteron, “wing”, because the hindwing is broader than the forewing). Adult dragonflies are characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, sometimes with coloured patches and an elongated body. Dragonflies can be mistaken […]","name-size":"","title":"Dragonfly","title-attr":"Dragonfly","latin-name":"Tarsophlebia eximia","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/740\/32082514971_274ed976a9_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Dragonfly<\/i> had a FLIGHT of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> This organism belonged to an extinct family of Odonates from the upper Jurassic and lower Cretaceous period of Eurasia. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Dragonfly","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/27326020\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28644","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDC2-tundra-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#ededc2","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/williamsonia-gigas\/","excerpt":"Williamsonia is an extinct genus of plant belonging to Bennettitales, an order of seed plants which bore a resemblance to cycads. Fossilized specimens of Williamsonia have been discovered worldwide.[1][3]   (From: Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Williamsonia Gigas","title-attr":"Williamsonia Gigas","latin-name":"Williamsonia gigas","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/742\/31825178640_1f925c6b09_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Spermatophyta<\/a>, Cycadeoidophyta<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> This is a seed plant that resembled cycads and belonged to the group, Bennettitales.It produced flowers up to 10 cm in length <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Williamsonia_(plant)","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/42431614\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28643","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCDB8-forest-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcdb8","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/bush-cricket\/","excerpt":"Archaboilus musicus is an extinct bush-cricket that lived during the Jurassic period 165 million years ago.[1] Although behaviors are difficult to reconstruct for extinct species, in 2012 British scientists recreated the cricket’s call based on a well-preserved fossil from China.[1][2] Based on studies, it is believed that male A. musicus produced pure-tone (musical) songs using […]","name-size":"","title":"Bush Cricket","title-attr":"Bush Cricket","latin-name":"Archaboilus musicus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/773\/32052121722_cd92b9f0f8_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This cricket had a MOVE of 1. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> It is believed that the male produced musical songs tuned at a frequency of 6.4 kHz. It fed on leaves and other insects. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Archaboilus_musicus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/28422513\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28642","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-fresh-water-ocean-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/ratfish-rabbitfish\/","excerpt":"schyodus is an extinct genus of cartilaginous fish belonging to the subclass Holocephali, which includes the modern-day chimaeras. Fossils are known from Europe (including Russia), North America, and New Zealand. Ischyodus was rather similar to the present-day chimaera Chimaera monstrosa, which is found in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Just like C. monstrosa, Ischyodus […]","name-size":"","title":"Ratfish, Rabbitfish","title-attr":"Ratfish, Rabbitfish","latin-name":"Ischyodus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/354\/32162452596_26175ccf35_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Chondrichthyes<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Ischyodus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2. <\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> The long spine attached to the dorsal fin of the Ischyodus may have been venomous. It preyed on small SHRIMP, claims, snails, crabs, etc. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ischyodus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4654268\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28641","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDC2-forest-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ededc2","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/cycads\/","excerpt":"Cycads \/\u02c8sa\u026ak\u00e6dz\/ are seed plants with a long fossil history that were formerly more abundant and more diverse than they are today. They typically have a stout and woody (ligneous) trunk with a crown of large, hard and stiff, evergreen leaves. They usually have pinnate leaves. The individual plants are either all male or all […]","name-size":"","title":"Cycads","title-attr":"Cycads","latin-name":"Cycads","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/358\/32082504941_9860a92e75_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Cycadophyta<\/a>, Cycadopsida<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> This type of plant is one of the first colonizers of terrestrial habitats, known to have lived in the Permian era over 200 million years ago. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Cycad","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4235\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28638","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-tundra-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/dilophosaurus\/","excerpt":"Dilophosaurus (\/da\u026a\u02cclo\u028af\u0259\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s, –fo\u028a–\/[1] dy-loaf-o-sawr-\u0259s) is a genus of theropod dinosaur. It contains a single known species, Dilophosaurus wetherilli, known from fossil remains found in the Kayenta formation of Arizona. This rock formation has been dated to the early Jurassic Period (Sinemurian age), about 193 million years ago. Dilophosaurus was among the largest carnivores of its […]","name-size":"","title":"Dilophosaurus","title-attr":"Dilophosaurus","latin-name":"Dilophosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/354\/32200894805_6f5e80babd_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Dilophosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> With its curling fingers, it was able to grasp prey and hold it tight while its powerful claws could tear meat from both living flesh and dead carcasses. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Dilophosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4531466\/data","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28637","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-tundra-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/allosaurus\/","excerpt":"Allosaurus (\/\u02cc\u00e6l\u0259\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/[1][2]) is a genus of large theropod dinosaur that lived 155 to 150\u00a0million years ago during the late Jurassic period (Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian[3]). The name “Allosaurus” means “different lizard”. It is derived from the Greek \u1f04\u03bb\u03bb\u03bf\u03c2\/allos (“different, other”) and \u03c3\u03b1\u1fe6\u03c1\u03bf\u03c2\/sauros (“lizard \/ generic reptile”). The first fossil remains that can definitely be ascribed […]","name-size":"","title":"Allosaurus","title-attr":"Allosaurus","latin-name":"Allosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/306\/31390499053_c83fbebf6b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Allosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> With powerful arms with large hands and claws to attack prey, it could strip flesh from the bone with a tugging motion that is similar to modern falcons.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Allosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4433671\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28636","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-tundra-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/apatosaurus\/","excerpt":"Apatosaurus (\/\u0259\u02ccp\u00e6t\u0259\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/;[1][2] meaning “deceptive lizard”) is a genus of extinct sauropod dinosaurs that lived in North America during the Late Jurassic period. Othniel Charles Marsh described and named the first-known species, A. ajax in 1877, and a second species, A. louisae, was discovered and named by William H. Holland in 1916. They lived about 152 […]","name-size":"","title":"Apatosaurus","title-attr":"Apatosaurus","latin-name":"Apatosaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/259\/32162431616_a0bc8f2f33_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Apatosaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> This dinosaur couldn’t chew, and had to swallow all of its plant food whole, feeding on ferns and conifer branches. It is\/was also one of the largest animals ever to walk the Earth.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Apatosaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4531260\/details","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28635","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-ocean-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/anaethalion-angustus\/","excerpt":"Anaethalion is an extinct genus of prehistoric ray-finned fish. (From Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Anaethalion Angustus","title-attr":"Anaethalion Angustus","latin-name":"Anaethalion Angustus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/656\/32162418596_dd9e177ddb_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Anaethalion<\/i> had a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> This fish fed on small crustaceans, insect larvae and other small animals. It also appeared to move to the sea as young adults to feed on other fish.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Anaethalion","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/10522660\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28634","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE8BE-tundra-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#cee8be","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/agilisaurus\/","excerpt":"Agilisaurus (\/\u02cc\u00e6d\u0292\u1d7bl\u1d7b\u02c8s\u0254\u02d0r\u0259s\/; ‘agile lizard’) is a genus of ornithischian dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic Period of what is now eastern Asia. The name is derived from the Latin “agilis” meaning ‘agile’ and the Greek “sauros” meaning ‘lizard’, and refers to the agility suggested by its lightweight skeleton and long legs. Its tibia (lower leg bone) […]","name-size":"","title":"Agilisaurus","title-attr":"Agilisaurus","latin-name":"Agilisaurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/625\/31390493653_41e7391818_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Agilisaurus<\/i> had a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Nicknamed “Agile Lizard” due to its long lower leg bones, this dinosaur weighed about as much as a cocker spaniel.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Agilisaurus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4658369\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28633","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D6D4-tundra-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d6d4","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/angustinaripterus\/","excerpt":"Angustinaripterus was a basal pterosaur, belonging to the Breviquartossa, and discovered at Dashanpu near Zigong in the Szechuan province of China. Angustinaripterus was named in 1983 by He Xinlu. The type species is Angustinaripterus longicephalus. The genus name is derived from Latin angustus, “narrow” and naris, “nostril”, combined with Latinized Greek pteron, “wing”. The specific […]","name-size":"","title":"Angustinaripterus","title-attr":"Angustinaripterus","latin-name":"Angustinaripterus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/618\/32052112982_1f6804bceb_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Sauropsida<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Angustinaripterus<\/i> had a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> This pterosaur had an unusual long snout studded with about two dozen forward-curving teeth. It may have fed on fish.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Angustinaripterus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/10589930\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28632","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDC2-forest-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ededc2","border-colour":"#9b9b9b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/brachyphyllum-2\/","excerpt":"Brachyphyllum is an extinct genus of plants belonging to Araucariaceae. They were found around the globe during the Carboniferous to the Cretaceous period.[1] (From Wikipedia, February 2017)","name-size":"","title":"Brachyphyllum","title-attr":"Brachyphyllum","latin-name":"Brachyphyllum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/612\/32052119202_b632feea40_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Pinophyta<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> These coniferous trees lived all over the globe during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Brachyphyllum","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/6067696\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28510","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDBB-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ededbb","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/scientific-insight\/","excerpt":"The eureka effect (also known as the aha! moment or eureka moment) refers to the common human experience of suddenly understanding a previously incomprehensible problem or concept. Some research describes the aha! effect (also known as insight or epiphany) as a memory advantage,[1] but conflicting results exist as to where exactly it occurs in the […]","name-size":"","title":"Scientific Insight","title-attr":"Scientific Insight","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7630\/27065900574_7949108b8c_z_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Can be played on the table next to the plater for the below effect.
    \n.
    \nEffect:<\/b> Leave this card on the table. This card enables the player to pick up two new cards per TURN instead of the usual one.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Eureka_effect","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28509","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDCD97-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#edcd97","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/darwin-gets-seasick\/","excerpt":"Charles Robert Darwin, FRS FRGS FLS FZS[2] (\/\u02c8d\u0251\u02d0rw\u026an\/;[3] 12\u00a0February 1809\u00a0\u2013 19\u00a0April 1882) was an Englishnaturalist and geologist,[4] best known for his contributions to evolutionary theory.[I] He established that allspecies of life have descended over time from common ancestors,[5] and in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern […]","name-size":"","title":"Darwin Gets Seasick","title-attr":"Darwin Gets Seasick","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7450\/27065898954_25b7d05bdd_z_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Can be played for the below effect, and then discarded.
    \n.
    \nEffect:<\/b> All other players must discard half (round down) of the cards in their hand.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Charles_Darwin","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28507","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDBCBC-grasslands-forest-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ddbcbc","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/falkland-islands-wolf\/","excerpt":"The Falkland Islands wolf (Dusicyon australis), also known as the warrah and occasionally as the Falkland Islands dog,Falkland Islands fox, or Antarctic wolf, was the only native land mammal of the Falkland Islands. This endemic canid becameextinct in 1876, the first known canid to have become extinct in historical times. It was the only modern […]","name-size":"","title":"Falkland Island’s Wolf","title-attr":"Falkland Island’s Wolf","latin-name":"Dusicyon australis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7500\/27678277866_4e35f69d4e_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> This wolf is EXTINCT & has a MOVE of 2.
    \n.
    \nFact:<\/b> Its scientific name means “foolish dog of the south,” indicative of its fearlessness, which led to it being easily hunted to extinction. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Falkland_Islands_wolf","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28506","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-B3F29F-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#b3f29f","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/human-influence\/","excerpt":"Human impact on the environment or anthropogenic impact on the environment includes impacts on biophysical environments, biodiversity, and other resources.[1][2] The term anthropogenic designates an effect or object resulting from human activity. The term was first used in the technical sense by Russian geologist Alexey Pavlov, and was first used in English by British ecologist […]","name-size":"","title":"Human Influence","title-attr":"Human Influence","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7108\/27065897574_32e3c86c27_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Play on a SPECIES<\/b> card.
    \n.
    \nEffect:<\/b> The played SPECIES<\/b> card is discarded immediately.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Human_impact_on_the_environment","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28503","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDD3-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ededd3","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/then-and-now\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Then and Now","title-attr":"Then and Now","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7245\/27577367382_4a23a06ea5_z_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Can be played at the start of one’s TURN for the below effect, and then discarded.<\/p>\n

    .<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/b> All EXTINCT<\/b> species on the table are discarded.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Golly Bard<\/em><\/span>gollybard.blogspot.ca\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Golly Bard","url":"http:\/\/gollybard.blogspot.ca\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28502","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BEDEE2-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#bedee2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pacific-sardine\/","excerpt":"The South American pilchard (Sardinops sagax) is a sardine of the family Clupeidae, the only member of the genus Sardinops. It is found in the Indo-Pacific and East Pacific oceans. Its length is up to 40\u00a0cm (16\u00a0in). It has other names, some of which more appropriately refer to subspecies, including blue pilchard, Australian pilchard (S. […]","name-size":"","title":"Pacific Sardine","title-attr":"Pacific Sardine","latin-name":"Sardinops sagax","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7426\/27398422600_8e1601e319_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play<\/b> This fish has a MOVE<\/b> of 2. Needs to be played next to a PLANKTON<\/b> species card.<\/p>\n

    for food.\n<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> This fish is found throughout the South Pacific (brown, green and purple card borders).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/South_American_pilchard","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/338628\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26473","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E5E5E5-grasslands-forest-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#e5e5e5","border-colour":"#3f912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/vinchuca\/","excerpt":"Triatoma infestans, commonly called winchuka[1] (vinchuca) in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, barbeiro in Brazil and also known as “kissing bug” or “barber bug” in English, is a blood-sucking bug (like all the members of its subfamily Triatominae) and the most important vector of Trypanosoma cruzi which can lead to Chagas disease. It is widespread in […]","name-size":"","title":"Vinchuca","title-attr":"Vinchuca","latin-name":"Triatoma infestans","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/260\/18885276578_12f9caf6f0_o_d.jpg","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/a\/a5\/Triatoma_infestans.jpg\/640px-Triatoma_infestans.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The vinchuca has a MOVE<\/b> of 2.<\/p>\n

    “It is most disgusting to feel soft wingless insects, about an inch long, crawling over ones body; before sucking they are quite thin, but afterwards round & bloated with blood.”<\/i> Darwin on the Vinchuca, 1835<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Triatoma_infestans","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2926803\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26472","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D6D6D6-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#d6d6d6","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/zooplankton-3\/","excerpt":"Zooplankton \/\u02cczo\u028a.\u0259\u02c8pl\u00e6\u014bkt\u0259n\/ are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word “zooplankton” is derived from the Greek zoon (\u03b6\u1ff4\u03bf\u03bd), meaning “animal”, and planktos (\u03c0\u03bb\u03b1\u03b3\u03ba\u03c4\u03cc\u03c2), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked […]","name-size":"","title":"Zooplankton","title-attr":"Zooplankton","latin-name":"Marine zooplankton","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"3","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3849\/19066893222_263492e014_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Anthropoda<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Zooplankton has a MOVE<\/b> of 1.
    \n“Many of these creatures so low in the scale of nature are most exquisite in their forms & rich colours. \u2014 It creates a feeling of wonder that so much beauty should be apparently created for such little purpose.”<\/i> (Darwin on plankton).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Zooplankton","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26468","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-grasslands-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#152687","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/baobab-tree\/","excerpt":"Adansonia digitata (baobab) is the most widespread of the Adansonia species on the African continent, found in the hot, dry savannahs of sub-Saharan Africa. Common names for the baobab include dead-rat tree (from the appearance of the fruits), monkey-bread tree (the soft, dry fruit is edible), upside-down tree (the sparse branches resemble roots), cream of […]","name-size":"","title":"Baobab Tree","title-attr":"Baobab Tree","latin-name":"Adansonia digitata","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/560\/18886764619_468834b47a_o_d.jpg","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/0\/09\/Baobab_and_elephant%2C_Tanzania.jpg\/640px-Baobab_and_elephant%2C_Tanzania.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> During the voyage, the observation of this tree (which can grow to be 6000 years old), is thought to have made Darwin ponder the long timescales in the Earth’s geology.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Adansonia_digitata","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/584789\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26464","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDED-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#ededed","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/giant-kelp-2\/","excerpt":"Macrocystis pyrifera, commonly known as giant kelp or giant bladder kelp, is a species of kelp (large brown algae), and one of four species in the genus Macrocystis. Giant kelp is common along the coast of the easternPacific Ocean, from Baja California north to southeast Alaska, and is also found in the southern oceans nearSouth […]","name-size":"","title":"Giant Kelp","title-attr":"Giant Kelp","latin-name":"Macrocystis pyrifera","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3909\/19046865436_3d60ac1fa1_o_d.jpg","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/f\/f8\/Sanc0063_-_Flickr_-_NOAA_Photo_Library.jpg\/640px-Sanc0063_-_Flickr_-_NOAA_Photo_Library.jpg","classification":"Chromalveolata<\/a>, Heterokontophyta<\/a>, Phaeophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> Darwin is thought to be one of the first scientists to consider the ecological importance of kelp comparing them to an aquatic version of a forest of trees.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Macrocystis_pyrifera","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/906815\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26434","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E0E0E0-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#e0e0e0","border-colour":"#3f912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/leaf-letter-flea-beetle\/","excerpt":"Flea beetle is a general name applied to the small, jumping beetles of the leaf beetle family(Chrysomelidae). They make up the tribe Alticini, which is a part of the subfamily Galerucinae, though they were historically classified as a subfamily in their own right. Though most tribes of the Galerucinae are suspect of rampant paraphyly in […]","name-size":"","title":"Leaf Letter Flea Beetle","title-attr":"Leaf Letter Flea Beetle","latin-name":"Aulonodera darwini","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/601\/20669028149_462e04900f_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> This Flea beetle has a MOVE<\/b> of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> This is one of four Australian insect species, collected by Darwin during the Beagle voyage, that bear his name.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Flea_beetle","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/7463\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26430","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E2E2E2-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#e2e2e2","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/sicyos-villosus\/","excerpt":"Sicyos is a flowering plant genus of the family Cucurbitaceae. Members of the genus are commonly known as burr cucumbers.[2] (From Wikipedia, August 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Sicyos villosus","title-attr":"Sicyos villosus","latin-name":"Cucurbitaceae Sicyos villosus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/457\/18884752898_2bf8cd75d1_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This plant is EXTINCT.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin’s single dried specimen of Sicyos villosus<\/i>, collected during the Beagle voyage, appears to be the only piece of evidence that showed this plant ever existed.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Sicyos","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/60997\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26167","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E0E0E0-desert-tundra-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#e0e0e0","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/galapagos-prickly-pear\/","excerpt":"Opuntia echios is a species of plant in the Cactaceae family. It is endemic to theGal\u00e1pagos Islands (Ecuador) and is commonly known as the Gal\u00e1pagos prickly pear, but there are five other species of prickly pears that also are endemic to the archipelago (O. galapageia, O. helleri, O. insularis, O. megasperma and O. saxicola). There […]","name-size":"","title":"Galapagos Prickly Pear","title-attr":"Galapagos Prickly Pear","latin-name":"Opuntia echios","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/507\/19066792912_7880fd129d_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> This prickly pear is a favourite meal for the Gal\u00e1pagos tortoises. It’s presence is also a selective pressure and has resulted in changes to the tortoise’s shell.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Opuntia_echios","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/5177784\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26165","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DBDBDB-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#dbdbdb","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/lord-ansons-blue-pea\/","excerpt":"Lathyrus \/\u02c8l\u00e6\u03b8\u0268r\u0259s\/[1] is a genus of flowering plant species known as sweet peas and vetchlings. Lathyrus is in thelegume family, Fabaceae, and contains approximately 160 species. They are native to temperate areas, with a breakdown of 52 species in Europe, 30 species in North America, 78 in Asia, 24 in tropical East Africa, and 24 […]","name-size":"","title":"Lathyrus nervosus","title-attr":"Lathyrus nervosus","latin-name":"Lathyrus nervosus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3867\/19067662222_d44bd29fd9_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> During the Beagle voyage, this pea plant specimen was collected in Bahia Blanca, near Buenos Aires on October 2nd, 1832.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Lathyrus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/639903\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26127","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-665F3E-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#665f3e","border-colour":"#665f3e","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/quinine-mw-324-4\/","excerpt":"Quinine (US \/\u02c8kwa\u026ana\u026an\/, \/kw\u026a\u02c8ni\u02d0n\/ or UK \/\u02c8kw\u026ani\u02d0n\/ kwin-een) is a white crystalline alkaloid having antipyretic (fever-reducing), antimalarial, analgesic (painkilling), and anti-inflammatoryproperties and a bitter taste. It is a stereoisomer of quinidine, which, unlike quinine, is an antiarrhythmic. Quinine contains two major fused-ring systems: the aromatic quinoline and thebicyclic quinuclidine. Quinine occurs naturally in the bark […]","name-size":"","title":"QUININE (MW: 324.4)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>QUININE (MW: 324.4)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/438\/19115789559_176ebdf2f8_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C20<\/sub>H24<\/sub>N2<\/sub>O2<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Cinchona trees.
    \nUSE: antipyretic, antimalarial.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Quinine","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26126","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DBD8AB-forest-forest-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#dbd8ab","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/cinchona-tree\/","excerpt":"Cinchona, common name quina, is a genus of about 25 recognized species in the family Rubiaceae, native to the tropical Andes forests of western South America.[2] A few species are reportedly naturalized in Central America, Jamaica, French Polynesia, Sulawesi, Saint Helena in the South Atlantic, and S\u00e3o Tome & Principe off the coast of tropical […]","name-size":"","title":"Cinchona tree","title-attr":"Cinchona tree","latin-name":"Cinchona genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/370\/18679414164_471f078639_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> The drug quinine is isolated from cinchona.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Cinchona","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/29559\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26125","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-000000-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#000000","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pseudoephedrine-mw-165-23\/","excerpt":"Ephedrine (i\/\u0268\u02c8f\u025bdr\u026an\/ or \/\u02c8\u025bf\u0268dri\u02d0n\/; not to be confused with ephedrone) is a sympathomimeticamine and substituted amphetamine commonly used as a stimulant, concentration aid,decongestant, appetite suppressant, and to treat hypotension associated with anaesthesia. Ephedrine is similar in molecular structure to the well-known drugs phenylpropanolamine andmethamphetamine, as well as to the important neurotransmitter epinephrine (adrenaline). Chemically, it […]","name-size":"smaller-12","title":"(PSEUDO*)EPHEDRINE (MW: 165.23)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>(PSEUDO*)EPHEDRINE (MW: 165.23)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/534\/19115783289_839163e3fe_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C10<\/sub>H15<\/sub>NO<\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Ma Huang. *Pseudoephedrine is a diastereomer of ephedrine<\/i>
    \nUSE: stimulant, bronchodilator, appetite suppressant.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ephedrine","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26124","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D1D1D1-grasslands-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#d1d1d1","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/ma-huang\/","excerpt":"Ephedra sinica (also known as Chinese\u00a0ephedra or Ma\u00a0Huang) is a plant species native to Mongolia,Russia (Buryatiya, Chita, Primorye), and northeastern China (Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning,Nei Mongol, Ningxia, Shaanxi, Shanxi).[1][2] Ephedra is a medicinal preparation from the plant Ephedra sinica.[1] Known in Chinese as ma huang (\u9ebb\u9ec3; pinyin: m\u00e1 hu\u00e1ng, which literally translates into English […]","name-size":"","title":"Ma Huang","title-attr":"Ma Huang","latin-name":"Ephedra sinica","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/481\/19114274850_28417d6104_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Gnetophyta<\/a>, Gnetopsida<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> The drugs ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are found in the Ma Huang plant.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ephedra_sinica","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1156286\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26060","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-875956-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#875956","border-colour":"#875956","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/penicillin-g-mw-334-4\/","excerpt":"Benzylpenicillin (INN, AAN, BAN), commonly known as penicillin G, (USAN) is a narrow spectrumpenicillin antibiotic that is given intravenously or intramuscularly as a treatment for syphilis,meningitis, endocarditis, pneumonia, lung abscessesand septicaemia in children.[1] Penicillin G is typically given by injection parenterally, bypassing the intestines, because it is unstable in the highly acidic stomach. Because the […]","name-size":"","title":"PENICILLIN G (MW: 334.4)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>PENICILLIN G (MW: 334.4)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/273\/18681312063_6efb0420d6_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C16<\/sub>H18<\/sub>N2<\/sub>O4<\/sub>S<\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Penicillium species
    \nUSE: antibiotic (also known as benzylpenicillin).
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Benzylpenicillin","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26059","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CCB5AF-forest-grasslands-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#ccb5af","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/penicillium\/","excerpt":"Penicillium chrysogenum is a species of fungus in the family Trichocomaceae. It is common in temperateand subtropical regions and can be found on salted food products,[1] but it is mostly found in indoor environments, especially in damp or water-damaged buildings.[2] It was previously known as Penicillium notatum.[3] It has rarely been reported as a cause […]","name-size":"","title":"Penicillium","title-attr":"Penicillium","latin-name":"Penicillium chrysogenum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/536\/19115771349_a0e07269ea_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Fungi<\/a>, Ascomycota<\/a>, Eurotiomycetes<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> The antibiotic, Penicillin G, is derived from this species of fungus.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Penicillium_chrysogenum","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2944750\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26058","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D1215C-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#d1215c","border-colour":"#d1215c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/morphinecodeine\/","excerpt":"Morphine (INN)\/\u02c8m\u0254rfi\u02d0n\/), sold under many trade names, is a pain medication of the opiate type. It acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease the feeling of pain. It can be used for bothacute pain and chronic pain. Morphine is also frequently used for pain from myocardial infarctionand during labour. It can be […]","name-size":"","title":"MORPHINE\/CODEINE<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>MORPHINE\/CODEINE<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/419\/19301886215_d004ca9f4d_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C17<\/sub>H19\/21<\/sub>NO3<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    MW: 285.34 \/ 299.364 g\/mol
    \nSOURCE: Opium poppy.
    \nUSE: analgesic, precursor to heroin\/methadone.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Morphine","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26057","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D8B8C0-forest-grasslands-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#d8b8c0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/opium-poppy\/","excerpt":"Papaver somniferum, the opium poppy,[2] is the species of plant from which opium and poppy seeds are derived. Opium is the source of many drugs, including morphine(and its derivative heroin), thebaine, codeine, papaverine, and noscapine. The Latin botanical name means the “sleep-bringing poppy”, referring to the sedative properties of some of these opiates. The opium […]","name-size":"","title":"Opium Poppy","title-attr":"Opium Poppy","latin-name":"Papaver somniferum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/328\/19114314718_be39c09a7f_o_d.png","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/8\/87\/Opium_poppy.jpg\/640px-Opium_poppy.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    FACT:<\/b> Opiates (such as morphine and codeine) are isolated from seeds of the poppy.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Papaver_somniferum","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/594796\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26056","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-4F4A3C-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#4f4a3c","border-colour":"#4f4a3c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/nicotine-mw-162-23\/","excerpt":"Nicotine is a potent parasympathomimetic alkaloidfound in the nightshade family of plants (Solanaceae) and a stimulant drug. Nicotine is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist,[3][4] (a Na\u207a\/K\u207a ionophore through neural postsynaptic membranes in mammals and insects) except atnAChR\u03b19 and nAChR\u03b110 where it acts as anantagonist.[3] It is made in the roots of and accumulates in […]","name-size":"","title":"NICOTINE (MW: 162.23)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>NICOTINE (MW: 162.23)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/260\/18681309423_3195a56f02_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C10<\/sub>H14<\/sub>O2<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Tobacco plant.<\/i>
    \nUSE: nicotinic acetylcholine agonist, stimulant.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Nicotine","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26036","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D5D6BA-forest-grasslands-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#d5d6ba","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/tobacco-plant\/","excerpt":"Nicotiana tabacum, or cultivated tobacco, is an annually-grownherbaceous plant. It is found only in cultivation, where it is the most commonly grown of all plants in the Nicotiana genus, and its leaves are commercially grown in many countries to be processed into tobacco. It grows to heights between 1 to 2 metres. Research is ongoing […]","name-size":"","title":"Tobacco plant","title-attr":"Tobacco plant","latin-name":"Nicotiana tabacum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3703\/19301876805_776156cde8_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> Tobacco contains the phytochemical, nicotine. <\/p>\n","temperature":"warm","temperature-data":["warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Nicotiana_tabacum","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/581050\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26052","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/thecamoeba\/","excerpt":"Thecamoeba is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the species Thecamoeba hilla .[1] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Thecamoeba","title-attr":"Thecamoeba","latin-name":"Amoeba genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/370\/19155122658_2d2c332e4c_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Amoebozoa<\/a>, Discosea<\/a>, Thecamoebida<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Thecamoeba has a MOVE of 2, and is considered an HETEROTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Amoebas are often defined as unicellular organisms with no defined shape.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm","temperature-data":["warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Thecamoeba","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/61697\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26051","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pinnularia\/","excerpt":"Pinnularia is a fresh water alga more specifically a type of Bacillariophyta (diatom). Pinnularia is a predominantly fresh-water alga, usually found in ponds and moist soil. They can also be found in springs, estuaries, sediments, and oceans. Members of this genus are most commonly found in 40cm (1\u00bc ft) of water, at 5\u00b0C (40 \u00b0F). […]","name-size":"","title":"Pinnularia","title-attr":"Pinnularia","latin-name":"Diatom group","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/469\/19346721371_60a9b14077_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromista<\/a>, Ochrophyta<\/a>, Bacillariophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Pinnularia is considered an AUXOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Pinnularia are common form of phytoplankton and have cell walls made of slilica (called a frustule).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Pinnularia","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11755\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26050","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/rhizamoeba\/","excerpt":"Rhizamoeba is an Amoebozoa genus.[1][2] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Rhizamoeba","title-attr":"Rhizamoeba","latin-name":"Amoeba genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/323\/19155126988_754d0cbc37_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Amoebozoa<\/a>, Tubulinea<\/a>, Leptomyxida<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Rhizamoeba has a MOVE of 2, and is considered an HETEROTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Amoebas are often defined as unicellular organisms with no defined shape.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Rhizamoeba","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62316\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26049","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/tetrahymena\/","excerpt":"Tetrahymena are free-living ciliate protozoa that can also switch from commensalistic to pathogenicmodes of survival. They are common in freshwater ponds. Tetrahymena species used as model organisms in biomedical research are T. thermophila and T. pyriformis.[1] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Tetrahymena","title-attr":"Tetrahymena","latin-name":"Tetrahymena genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3740\/19336663402_124057f2dd_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Alveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>, Oligohymenophorea<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Tetrahymena has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an HETEROTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Tetrahymena is a widely used model organism in biological research.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Tetrahymena","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/61455\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26048","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/rotifer\/","excerpt":"The rotifers (Rotifera, commonly called wheel animals) make up a phylum of microscopic and near-microscopic pseudocoelomate animals. They were first described by Rev. John Harris in 1696, and other forms were described by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1703.[1] Most rotifers are around 0.1\u20130.5\u00a0mm long (although their size can range from 50\u00a0\u03bcm to over 2\u00a0mm),[2] and […]","name-size":"","title":"Rotifer","title-attr":"Rotifer","latin-name":"Rotifer Phyla","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/457\/19346715151_c91fae7845_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Metazoa<\/a>, Rotifera<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Rotifer has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an EUKARYOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The body of a Rotifer is divided into a head, trunk and foot, as well as being often cylindrical.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Rotifer","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26047","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/rimaleptus\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Rimaleptus","title-attr":"Rimaleptus","latin-name":"Dileptus genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3683\/19155106060_923e82e6d5_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Alveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>, Litostomatea<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Dileptus has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an EUKARYOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Dileptus has a prehensile probiscus that is loaded with toxins used to stun prey.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/31259986\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26046","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/phacus\/","excerpt":"Phacus is a genus of unicellular protists, of the phylum Euglenozoa (also known as Euglenophyta). They are light-green and are commonly found in freshwater pools, propelling themselves by gyrating their bodies. They have a single flagellum which is often as long as the Phacus’ body. Euglenid, with plastids, rigid, flattened cells, most species very flat […]","name-size":"","title":"Phacus","title-attr":"Phacus","latin-name":"Phacus genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/526\/19156587579_e2ebbfde0d_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Protozoa<\/a>, Euglenozoa<\/a>, Euglenophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Phacus has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an AUXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Phacus propels itself by gyrating its body.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Phacus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11710\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26044","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/polychaos\/","excerpt":"Polychaos is an amoeboid genus in the Amoebozoa group.[2] Several characters unite the species in this genus. The pseudopods meld at their bases when the organism is moving, and have dorsal, longitudinal ridges. The nucleus is oval or ellipsoid.[3] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Polychaos","title-attr":"Polychaos","latin-name":"Polychaos genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/532\/19155109800_28b53090bb_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Amoebozoa<\/a>, Tubulinea<\/a>, Tubulinida<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Polychaos has a MOVE<\/b> of 2, and is considered an HETEROTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Polychaos are often defined as unicellular organisms with no defined shape.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Polychaos","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62532\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26042","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/peridinium\/","excerpt":"Peridinium is a genus of motile, marine and freshwater dinoflagellates.[2][3] Their morphology is considered typical of the armoured dinoflagellates, and their form is commonly used in diagrams of a dinoflagellate’s structure.[4][2] Peridinium can range from 30-70 \u03bcm in diameter, and has very thick thecal plates.[4][2]\\ (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Peridinium","title-attr":"Peridinium","latin-name":"Peridinium genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/529\/19336674692_23f1c93d59_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromista<\/a>, Dinophyta<\/a>, Dinophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Peridinium has a MOVE of 1, and is considered a MIXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Peridinium morphology is typical of an armoured dinoflagellate type.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Peridinium","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11700\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26041","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/petalomonas\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Petalomonas","title-attr":"Petalomonas","latin-name":"Petalomonas genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/544\/19155132858_fd0a55b8e8_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Protozoa<\/a>, Euglenozoa<\/a>, Euglenophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Petalomonas has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an HETEROTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Petalomonas feeds by phagocytosis.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/13227\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26040","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/paramecium\/","excerpt":"Paramecium (parr-\u0259-mee-sh(ee-)\u0259m, \/\u02ccp\u00e6r\u0259\u02c8mi\u02d0\u0283\u2071\u0259m\/[1] or parr-\u0259-mee-see-\u0259m, \/\u02ccp\u00e6r\u0259\u02c8mi\u02d0si\u0259m\/) is a genus of unicellular ciliated protozoa, commonly studied as a representative of the ciliate group.Paramecia are widespread in freshwater, brackish, and marine environments and are often very abundant in stagnant basins and ponds. Because some species are readily cultivated and easily induced to conjugate and divide, it has […]","name-size":"","title":"Paramecium","title-attr":"Paramecium","latin-name":"Paramecium genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/266\/19346725251_b82a6b2831_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Alveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>, Oligohymenophorea<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Paramecium has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an EUKARYOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The green things are endosymbiotic algae known as chlorella.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Paramecium","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/61312\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26039","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/nitzschia\/","excerpt":"Nitzschia is a common pennate marine diatom. In the scientific literature this genus is sometimes termedNitzchia, this taxon has many species described, which all have a similar morphology. (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Nitzschia","title-attr":"Nitzschia","latin-name":"Nitzschia group","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3701\/19342745285_24b3260779_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromista<\/a>, Ochrophyta<\/a>, Bacillariophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Nitzschia is considered an AUXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Nitzschia are a common form of phytoplankton and have cell walls made of silica (called a frustule).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Nitzschia","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1221951\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26038","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/nebela\/","excerpt":"   ","name-size":"","title":"Nebela","title-attr":"Nebela","latin-name":"Nebela genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/294\/18720223294_7650e5d339_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Tubulinea<\/a>, Arcellinida<\/a>, Amoebazoa<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Nebela has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an EUKARYTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Nebela are often found living on mosses and humus rich soils. They can be as small as 30um but also reach up to sizes of 380um.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62177\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26035","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-AD2062-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ad2062","border-colour":"#ad2062","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/salicin-mw-286-28\/","excerpt":"Salicin is an alcoholic \u03b2-glucoside. Salicin is an anti-inflammatory agent that is produced in willow bark.[2]Salicin is also commonly found in the bark of Populus species, and the leaves of willows and poplars. It is also found in castoreum, which was used as ananalgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic. The activity of castoreum has been credited to […]","name-size":"","title":"SALICIN (MW: 286.28)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>SALICIN (MW: 286.28)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/422\/18681306793_63b5d4dfac_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C13<\/sub>H18<\/sub>O7<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: White Willow
    \nUSE: precursor to Aspirin. antipyretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Salicin","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26034","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DBABC3-forest-fresh-water-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#dbabc3","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/white-willow\/","excerpt":"Salix alba (white willow) is a species of willow native toEurope and western and central Asia.[1][2] The name derives from the white tone to the undersides of the leaves. It is a medium-sized to large deciduous tree growing up to 10\u201330 m tall, with a trunk up to 1 m diameter and an irregular, often-leaning […]","name-size":"","title":"White Willow","title-attr":"White Willow","latin-name":"Salix alba","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/298\/19275831466_9c280cc569_o_d.png","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/f\/f8\/Salix_alba_leaves.jpg\/640px-Salix_alba_leaves.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> The drug Salicin is isolated from the bark of the White Willow. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Salix_alba","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/8671774\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26033","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/water-pollution\/","excerpt":"Water pollution is the contamination of water bodies (e.g. lakes, rivers, oceans, aquifersand groundwater). This form of environmental degradation occurs when pollutants are directly or indirectly discharged into water bodies without adequate treatment to remove harmful compounds. Water pollution affects the entire biosphere\u00a0\u2013 plants and organisms living in these bodies of water. In almost all […]","name-size":"","title":"Water Pollution","title-attr":"Water Pollution","latin-name":"Event card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3732\/19336660672_202544c5ef_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Place this card on any ocean or freshwater based SPECIES<\/b> card.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/b> The SPECIES<\/b> card is IMMEDIATELY<\/n> discarded.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Water_pollution","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26032","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/research-card\/","excerpt":"Research comprises “creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock ofknowledge, including knowledge of humans, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications.”[1] It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support […]","name-size":"","title":"Research Card","title-attr":"Research Card","latin-name":"Event card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/269\/18722116133_ff8900eeda_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> You can play this card immediately after your opponent has played an EVENT<\/b> card on one of your SPECIES<\/b> cards.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/b> Negates the effect of the EVENT card. Does not work on EVENT cards that are not played specifically on top of a SPECIES<\/b> card.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Research","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26031","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/lepocinclis\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Lepocinclis","title-attr":"Lepocinclis","latin-name":"Leponcinclis genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/379\/18720227124_2ed193e471_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Protozoa<\/a>, Euglenozoa<\/a>, Euglenophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Leponcinclis has a MOVE<\/b> of 1, and is considered both a MIXOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Leponcinclis is photosynthetic but can also feed off smaller pond organisms.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11706\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26030","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/netrium\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Netrium","title-attr":"Netrium","latin-name":"Netrium genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/554\/19342745925_877c420c83_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Charophyta<\/a>, Conjugatophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Netrium is considered an AUXOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Netrium is an algae of the desmid family.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11678\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26029","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/nassula\/","excerpt":"Nassula is a genus of unicellular ciliate protists, belonging to the class Nassophorea. Like other members of the class, Nassula possesses a basket-like feeding apparatus (nasse, or cyrtos) made up of cytopharyngeal rods (nematodesmata), which are themselves composed of closely packed microtubules.[1][2][3] Nassula use this structure to ingest filamentous cyanobacteria, drawing individual strands of blue-green […]","name-size":"","title":"Nassula","title-attr":"Nassula","latin-name":"Nassula species","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/351\/19156595259_5b203800b5_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Alveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>, Nassophorea<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Nassula has a MOVE of 1, and is considered a HETEROTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Nassula possesses a basket like feeding apparatus which looks like a group of straight lines.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Nassula","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26026","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/korotnevella\/","excerpt":"Korotnevella is a genus of Amoebozoa. It includes the species Korotnevella hemistylolepis.[1] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Korotnevella","title-attr":"Korotnevella","latin-name":"Korotnevella genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/402\/19346733571_8edc452d63_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Flabellinea<\/a>, Dactylopodida<\/a>, Amoebazoa<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Korotnevella has a MOVE of 1,and is considered an HETEROTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Ciliates are characterized by the presence of hair like organelles called cilia.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Korotnevella","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2960018\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26025","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/hyalotheca\/","excerpt":"In taxonomy, Hyalotheca is a genus of algae, specifically of the Desmidiaceae.[1] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Hyalotheca","title-attr":"Hyalotheca","latin-name":"Hyalotheca genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/446\/18720229784_8f6d61b39a_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Charophyta<\/a>, Conjugatophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Hyalotheca is considered an AUXOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Hyalotheca are a genus of filamentous green algae.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Hyalotheca","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11655\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26024","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/hyalosphenia\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Hyalosphenia","title-attr":"Hyalosphenia","latin-name":"Amoeba genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/459\/19155126790_b591998102_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Amoebozoa<\/a>, Tubulinea<\/a>, Arcellinida<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Hyalosphenia has a MOVE of 1,and is considered a HETEROTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Hyalosphenia is a testate amoeba that has photosynthetic symbionts (the green particles-chlorella)<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2911712\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26023","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/euplotes\/","excerpt":"The hypotrichs are a group of ciliate protozoa, included among the spirotrichs. Most are oval in shape, with a rigid pellicle, and have cirri (bundles of cilia) distributed in isolated tufts on the ventral surface of the cell. Some also have dorsal cilia, which function as sensory bristles. Euplotes and Aspidisca are common genera. Like […]","name-size":"","title":"Euplotes","title-attr":"Euplotes","latin-name":"Euplotes genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/424\/18722133983_6ee0f39c3b_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Alveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>, Spirotrichea<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Euplotes has a MOVE<\/b> of 1, and is considered an HETEROTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Euplotes often have dorsal (sensory) and ventral (movement) cilia.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Hypotrich","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62158\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26021","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/eunotia\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Eunotia","title-attr":"Eunotia","latin-name":"Diatom group","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/416\/19342756205_10481f2cde_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromista<\/a>, Ochrophyta<\/a>, Bacillariophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Eunotia is considered an AUXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Eunotia are a common form of phytoplankton and have cell walls made of silica (called a frustule).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11735\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26020","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/eudorina\/","excerpt":"Eudorina is a genus of colonial green algae, specifically of the Volvocaceae.[1] Eudorina colonies consist of 16, 32 or 64 individual cells grouped together. Each individual cell contains flagella which allow the colony to move as a whole when the individual cells beat their flagella together. Description by GM Smith (1920, p 95):[2] Eudorina Ehrenberg […]","name-size":"","title":"Eudorina","title-attr":"Eudorina","latin-name":"Volvocaceae family","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/454\/19155149058_f70d04b51a_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Chlorophyceae<\/a>, Chlamydomonadales<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Eudorina is considered an AUXOTROPH.<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Volvocales can form colonies known as a gonium (4-32 cells) or a volvox (>500 cells).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Eudorina","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11634\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26019","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/drought-2\/","excerpt":"Drought is an extended time when a region receives a deficiency in its water supply, whether atmospheric,surface or ground water. A drought can last for months or years, or may be declared after as few as 15 days.[1]Generally, this occurs when a region receives consistently below average precipitation. It can have a substantial impact on […]","name-size":"","title":"Drought","title-attr":"Drought","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/456\/19155150508_1365d598b2_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Place this card on any ocean or freshwater based SPECIES<\/b> card<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/b> The SPECIES<\/b> card is IMMEDIATELY<\/b> discarded.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Drought","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26018","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/cosmarium\/","excerpt":"In taxonomy, Cosmarium is a genus of algae, specifically of the Desmidiaceae.[1]\u00a0In this complex genus the cells are very variable. All are constricted in the middle.[2] (From:Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Cosmarium","title-attr":"Cosmarium","latin-name":"Desmidiales order","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3935\/19336692732_e05267e444_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Charophyta<\/a>, Conjugatophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Cosmarium is considered an AUXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Desmids tend to assume highly symmetrical and attractive shapes.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Cosmarium","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11647\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26014","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/micrasterias\/","excerpt":"Micrasterias is a unicellular green alga of the Desmidiales order. Micrasterias, commonly known as green alga, is a eukaryotic, unicellular organism, and species vary in size reaching up to hundreds of microns. Micrasterias displays a bilateral symmetry, with two mirror image semi-cells joined by a narrow isthmus containing the nucleus of the organism. This dual […]","name-size":"","title":"Micrasterias","title-attr":"Micrasterias","latin-name":"Micrasterias genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/418\/19316660466_6455d2bfc7_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Charophyta<\/a>, Conjugatophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Micrasterias is considered an AUXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Micraserias is a type of green algae, and always has shapes that exhibit bilaterial symmetry.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Micrasterias","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11656\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26012","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/closterium\/","excerpt":"In taxonomy, Closterium is a genus of algae, specifically of the family Closteriaceae.[1] (From: Wikipedia, July 2015)","name-size":"","title":"Closterium","title-attr":"Closterium","latin-name":"Desmidiales order","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3790\/19346743181_7894ba698c_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Charophyta<\/a>, Fragilariophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Closterium is considered an AUXOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Desmids tend to assume highly symmetrical and attractive shapes.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Closterium","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11646\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26011","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/climate-change-4\/","excerpt":"  Climate change is a change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns when that change lasts for an extended period of time (i.e., decades to millions of years). Climate change may refer to a change in average weather conditions, or in the time variation of weather around longer-term average conditions (i.e., more or fewer […]","name-size":"","title":"Climate Change","title-attr":"Climate Change","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3950\/18722141093_a220173b77_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Place this card on top of any SPECIES<\/b> card.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/b> The SPECIES<\/b> card is IMMEDIATELY<\/b> discarded. In the same action, this EVENT card then moves to an adjacent SPECIES card. A game of rock-paper-scissors determines whether this 2nd SPECIES card is also discarded. Continue moving the EVENT card and removing SPECIES cards until your opponent wins at rock-paper-scissors. This card can only be played once per game.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Climate_change","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26009","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/ciliophrys\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Ciliophrys","title-attr":"Ciliophrys","latin-name":"Heliozea type","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/538\/19155135540_48510751f4_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromista<\/a>, Ochrophyta<\/a>, Dictyochophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Ciliophrys has a MOVE of 1,and is considered a EUKARYOTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Heliozoa is a type of amoeba that is spherical with stiff prjections (axopods) radiating outwards from its body.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62067\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26006","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/blepharisma\/","excerpt":"Blepharisma is a genus of unicellular ciliate protists found in fresh and salt water. The group includes about 40 accepted species, and many sub-varieties and strains. While species vary considerably in size and shape, most are easily identified by their red or pinkish color, which is caused by granules of the pigment Blepharismin.[1] All members […]","name-size":"","title":"Blepharisma","title-attr":"Blepharisma","latin-name":"Ciliophora phyla","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/267\/18722143703_1ec9b564c0_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Alveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>, Heterotrichea<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Blepharisma has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an HETEROTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Cilates are characterized by the presence of hair like organelles called cilia. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Blepharisma","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62044\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25999","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/algae-bloom\/","excerpt":"An algal bloom is a rapid increase or accumulation in the population ofalgae (typically microscopic) in a water system. Cyanobacteria blooms are often called blue-green algae. Algal blooms may occur in freshwater as well as marine environments. Typically, only one or a small number ofphytoplankton species are involved, and some blooms may be recognized by […]","name-size":"","title":"Algae Bloom","title-attr":"Algae Bloom","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/534\/18720245134_d92069117e_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Can be played for below effect and then discarded<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/b> You may remove any 2 AUXOTROPHS<\/b> on the table and place them elsewhere at your disgression.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Algal_bloom","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"26001","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/anisonema\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Anisonema","title-attr":"Anisonema","latin-name":"Euplotes genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/361\/18722144703_51ea9304bc_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Euglenozoa<\/a>, Euglenida<\/a>, Sphenomonadales<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Anisonema has a MOVE of 1, and is considered an HETEROTROPH<\/b><\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Anisonema have two flagella which beat in different but coordinated ways<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/11715\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25996","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C2E2EA-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c2e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/actinophrys\/","excerpt":"The actinophryids are small, familiar group of heliozoan protists. They are the most common heliozoa in fresh water, and are especially frequent in lakes and rivers, but a few are found in marine and soil habitats as well. Each actinophryid are unicellular and roughly spherical in shape, without any shell or test, and with many […]","name-size":"","title":"Actinophrys","title-attr":"Actinophrys","latin-name":"Heliozoa type","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/323\/18722147723_145a68168e_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromalveolata<\/a>, Stramenopiles<\/a>, Actinochrysophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Actinophyrys has a MOVE of 1, and is considered a EUKARYOTROPH.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Heliozoa is a type of amoeba that is spherical with stiff projections (axopods) radiating outwards from its body.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Actinophryid","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/62068\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25980","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D62704-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#d62704","border-colour":"#d62704","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/paclitaxel-mw-853-906\/","excerpt":"Paclitaxel is a medication used to treat a number of types of cancerincluding: ovarian cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancer among others.[2] It and docetaxel represent the taxane family of drugs. Paclitaxel’s mechanism of action involves interference with the normal breakdown of microtubules during cell division. Common side effects include: hair loss, muscle […]","name-size":"","title":"PACLITAXEL (MW: 853.906)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>PACLITAXEL (MW: 853.906)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/488\/19295912372_6b492dbd70_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C47<\/sub>H51<\/sub>NO14<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Pacific Yew Tree
    \nUSE: (also known as TAXOL) mitotic inhibitor, lung, ovarian, breast cancer chemotherapy.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Paclitaxel","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25979","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDB3B3-forest-grasslands-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#ddb3b3","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pacific-yew\/","excerpt":"Taxus brevifolia (Pacific yew or western yew) is a conifernative to the Pacific Northwest of North America. It ranges from southernmost Alaska south to central California, mostly in the Pacific Coast Ranges, but with isolated disjunctpopulations in southeast British Columbia (most notably occurring on Zuckerberg Island near Castlegar) and in north to central Idaho.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The […]","name-size":"","title":"Pacific Yew","title-attr":"Pacific Yew","latin-name":"Taxus brevifolio","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/401\/18679399994_04516a0bf5_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Pinophyta<\/a>, Pinopsida<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    FACT:<\/b> The drug Paclitaxel is isolated from the bark of the Pacific Yew Tree. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Taxus_brevifolia","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/media.eol.org\/pages\/991548\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25978","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-5A912D-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#5a912d","border-colour":"#5a912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/%ce%949-tetrahydrocannabinol\/","excerpt":"Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or more precisely its main isomer (\u2212)-trans-\u03949-tetrahydrocannabinol (\u200a(6aR,10aR)-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol), is the principal psychoactive constituent (or cannabinoid) of cannabis. First isolated in 1964 by Israeli scientists Prof. Raphael Mechoulam and Dr. Yechiel Gaoni at the Weizmann Institute of Science[8][9][10] it is a water-clear glassy solid when cold, which becomes viscous and sticky if warmed. A […]","name-size":"smaller-13","title":"\u03949 TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>\u03949 TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL<\/font>","latin-name":"(MW: 314.469)","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/355\/19275858806_47bbecb1f3_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C17<\/sub>H23<\/sub>NO3<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Atropa belladonna<\/i>
    \nUSE: acetylcholine antagonist, pupil dilation, cardiac resuscitation, nerve gas treatment.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Tetrahydrocannabinol","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25976","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CCD8B1-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#ccd8b1","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/cannabis-sativa\/","excerpt":"Cannabis sativa is an annual herbaceous plant in the Cannabis genus, a species of the Cannabaceae family. People have cultivated Cannabis sativa throughoutrecorded history as a source of industrial fibre, seed oil, food, recreation, religious and spiritual moods, and medicine. Each part of the plant is harvested differently, depending on the purpose of its use. […]","name-size":"","title":"Cannabis sativa","title-attr":"Cannabis sativa","latin-name":"Cannabis sativa","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/277\/18681330393_f1affb6661_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    FACT:<\/b> The drug tetrahydrocannabol is isolated from Cannabis sativa<\/i>. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Cannabis_sativa","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/labs.eol.org\/pages\/594919\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25975","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-A33625-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#a33625","border-colour":"#a33625","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/caffeine-mw-194-19\/","excerpt":"Caffeine (\/k\u00e6\u02c8fi\u02d0n, \u02c8k\u00e6fi\u02d0n, \u02c8k\u00e6fi\u02d0\u026an\/) is a central nervous system (CNS)stimulant of the methylxanthine class of psychoactive drugs.[8] It is the world’s most widely consumed psychoactive drug, but unlike many other psychoactive substances, it is legal and unregulated in nearly all parts of the world. It is a bitter, white crystalline purine, a methylxanthine alkaloid, and […]","name-size":"","title":"CAFFEINE (MW: 194.19)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>CAFFEINE (MW: 194.19)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/405\/19114325008_c676669d9a_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C8<\/sub>H10<\/sub>N4<\/sub>O2<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Coffea arabica, Coffea canaphora, Camellia sinesnis<\/i>
    \nUSE: central nervous system stimulant
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Caffeine","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25973","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EAAFA6-forest-grasslands-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#eaafa6","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/coffea-arabica\/","excerpt":"Coffea arabica \/\u0259\u02c8r\u00e6b\u026ak\u0259\/ is a species of Coffea originally indigenous to the forests of the southwestern highlands of Ethiopia. It is also known as the “coffee shrub of Arabia”, “mountain coffee” or “arabica coffee”. Coffea arabicais believed to be the first species of coffee to be cultivated. Wild plants grow to between 9 and 12 […]","name-size":"","title":"Coffea Arabica","title-attr":"Coffea Arabica","latin-name":"Coffea Arabica","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/408\/19301894795_613bd75447_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    FACT:<\/b> C. arabica<\/i> contains less CAFFEINE than other commercially available species of coffee.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Coffea_arabica","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/media.eol.org\/pages\/1109554\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25972","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-1D3E47-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#1d3e47","border-colour":"#1d3e47","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/atropine-mw-289-369\/","excerpt":"Atropine is a naturally occurring tropane alkaloid extracted from deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), Jimson weed (Datura stramonium), mandrake (Mandragora officinarum) and other plants of the familySolanaceae. It is a secondary metabolite of these plants and serves as a drug with a wide variety of effects. In general, atropine counters the “rest and digest” activity of […]","name-size":"","title":"ATROPINE (MW: 289.369)<\/font>","title-attr":"<font color=white>ATROPINE (MW: 289.369)<\/font>","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/536\/19114317128_b412482bcf_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"chemistry<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    C17<\/sub>H23<\/sub>NO3<\/sub><\/font><\/h2>\n

    SOURCE: Atropa belladonna<\/i>
    \nUSE: acetylcholine antagonist, pupil dilation, cardiac resuscitation, nerve gas treatment.
    \nPLAY: Place under source card for + 5 points.<\/font><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stephen McNeil<\/em><\/span>people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stephen McNeil","url":"https:\/\/people.ok.ubc.ca\/wsmcneil\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Atropine","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25971","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-ADDBCA-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#addbca","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/deadly-nightshade\/","excerpt":"Atropa belladonna or Atropa bella-donna, commonly known asbelladonna or deadly nightshade, is a perennial herbaceous plant in the family Solanaceae, native to Europe, North Africa, Western Asia, and some parts of Canada and the United States. The foliage and berries are extremely toxic, containing tropane alkaloids. These toxins include scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which cause a […]","name-size":"","title":"Deadly Nightshade","title-attr":"Deadly Nightshade","latin-name":"Atropa belladonna","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3835\/19114273110_fba68b3642_o_d.png","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/7\/79\/Atropa_bella-donna1.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    FACT:<\/b> The drug ATROPINE is isolated from A. belladonna<\/i>.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Atropa_belladonna","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/581107\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25961","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D1C0E2-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#d1c0e2","border-colour":"#d1c0e2","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pacific-spirit-park-deck\/","excerpt":"Pacific Spirit Regional Park is a 874 hectares (2,160 acres)[1] park located in the University Endowment Lands, on Point Grey to the west of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia. It surrounds the endowment lands of the University of British Columbia on the shores of Georgia Straitin the Pacific Ocean. It is a nature preserve […]","name-size":"","title":"PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK DECK","title-attr":"PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK DECK","latin-name":"Home Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/543\/19085449479_2df818bb6a_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Home<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    The PACIFIC SPIRIT PARK deck uses content created by students in U Hill Elementary School’s, Division 15, Grade 1 class. Led by their teacher, Kate Foreman, the children did an amazing job researching the forest that lays adjacent to the school!<\/p>\n

    .<\/p>\n

    (PROTOTYPE DIY CLASSROOM DECK<\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Rowan<\/em><\/span>go.vsb.bc.ca\/schools\/uhe\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Rowan","url":"http:\/\/go.vsb.bc.ca\/schools\/uhe\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25944","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8B7BD-desert-desert-desert-1.png","card-colour":"#e8b7bd","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/village-indigobird\/","excerpt":"The village indigobird or steelblue widowfinch (Vidua chalybeata) is a small songbird belonging to the family Viduidae. Origin and phylogeny has been obtained by Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al.[2] Estrildinae may have originated in India and dispersed thereafter (towards Africa and Pacific Ocean habitats). It is a resident breeding bird in most of Africa south of […]","name-size":"","title":"Village Indigobird","title-attr":"Village Indigobird","latin-name":"Vidua chalybeata","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/410\/19030766599_bf5fa914a3_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/160.111.248.28\/content\/2014\/10\/09\/11\/26615_orig.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Village Indigobird has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/b> The Village Indigobird is a brood parasite which lays its eggs in the nests of red-billed fire finches.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Village_indigobird","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25943","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4D9BA-fresh-water-fresh-water-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#f4d9ba","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/duck-billed-platypus\/","excerpt":"The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) also known as the duck-billed platypus is asemiaquatic egg-laying mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth. It is the sole living representative of its […]","name-size":"","title":"Duck-billed Platypus","title-attr":"Duck-billed Platypus","latin-name":"Ornithorhynchus anatinus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3889\/18563224504_576f950c89_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The platypus has a MOVE of 2 and must feed off of a FRESHWATER TERRAIN card.
    \nFact:<\/b> The platypus is only one of a very few mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Platypus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/323858\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25942","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-B5F2E0-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#b5f2e0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/variable-neon-slug\/","excerpt":"Nembrotha kubaryana, also known as the variable neon slug, is a species of colorful sea slug, a dorid nudibranch, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Polyceridae. [3] This animal can reach a total length of more than 120 mm. It is a large dark-bodied nudibranch which may have green stripes running down the length […]","name-size":"","title":"Variable Neon Slug","title-attr":"Variable Neon Slug","latin-name":"Nembrotha kubaryana","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3888\/19185709775_1d0ccd8294_o_d.jpg","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/5\/52\/Nembrotha_kubaryana_%28Nudibranch%29.jpg\/640px-Nembrotha_kubaryana_%28Nudibranch%29.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Mollusca<\/a>, Gastropoda<\/a>","point-score":"10","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> This slug has a MOVE of 1 and can only feed off of SPECIES cards with class ASCIDIACEA.
    \nFact:<\/b> This slug can store, in its tissues, the toxins from the ascidians it eats and then can release them in a slimy defensive mucus when alarmed.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Nembrotha_kubaryana","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2942028\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25939","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DCF7CD-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#dcf7cd","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/cape-sundew\/","excerpt":"Drosera capensis, commonly known as the Cape sundew, is a small rosette-forming carnivorous species ofperennial[1] sundew native to the Cape in South Africa. Because of its size, easy to grow nature, and the copious amounts of seed it produces, it has become one of the most common sundews in cultivation.D.\u00a0capensis produces strap-like leaves, up to […]","name-size":"","title":"Cape Sundew","title-attr":"Cape Sundew","latin-name":"Drosera capensis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/368\/18999552049_92683fdbda_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/160.111.248.28\/content\/2011\/10\/06\/04\/96281_orig.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Cape Sundew is carnivorous, but can also use photosynthesis. Therefore it can be played as a YELLOW FOOD 1 and\/or RED FOOD CHAIN 3.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Cape sundew has long, thin leaves that roll up around trapped insects.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Drosera_capensis","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/5470948\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25938","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2E4CB-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#f2e4cb","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/giant-cuttlefish\/","excerpt":"Sepia apama, also known as the giant cuttlefish and Australian giant cuttlefish,[2] is the world’s largestcuttlefish species, growing to 50\u00a0cm in mantle length and over 10.5\u00a0kg (23\u00a0lb) in weight.[3] Using cells known as chromatophores, the cuttlefish can put on spectacular displays, changing color in an instant. S. apama is native to the southern coast of […]","name-size":"","title":"Giant Cuttlefish","title-attr":"Giant Cuttlefish","latin-name":"Sepia apama","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/476\/19179649772_aa2d291ce3_o_d.jpg","photo":"https:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/e\/e0\/Sepia_apama_2.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Mollusca<\/a>, Cephalopoda<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Giant Cuttlefish has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Using cells known as chromatophores, the cuttlefish can put on spectacular displays, changing color in an instant.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Sepia_apama","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/media.eol.org\/pages\/593213\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25937","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D8EAC7-grasslands-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#d8eac7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/panther-chameleon\/","excerpt":"The panther chameleon (Furcifer pardalis) is a species of chameleon found in the eastern and northern parts of Madagascar[3] in a tropical forest biome. Additionally, it has been introduced toR\u00e9union and Mauritius. Male panther chameleons can grow up to 20\u00a0inches in length, with a typical length of around 17\u00a0in (45\u00a0cm). Females are smaller, at about […]","name-size":"","title":"Panther Chameleon","title-attr":"Panther Chameleon","latin-name":"Furcifer pardalis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/451\/18997422738_29c9a645bc_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Reptilia<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This cameleon has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The panther chameleons have very long tongues which can extend at around 26 body lengths per second<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Panther_chameleon","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1056895\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25936","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D5F2EC-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#d5f2ec","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/bone-worm\/","excerpt":"Osedax rubiplumus is a species of bathypelagic Polychaetes that is reported to sustain itself on the bones of dead\u00a0whales. Their paedomorphic males are 0.4\u20131.1 millimetres (0.016\u20130.043\u00a0in), and have an incompleted prototroch with a posterior hooked chaete. The species have 16 hooks with 6-8 capitium teeth, which have handles that are 18\u201323 micrometres (0.00071\u20130.00091\u00a0in). The female […]","name-size":"","title":"Bone Worm","title-attr":"Bone Worm","latin-name":"Osedax rubiplumus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/307\/18562127854_567b4020ce_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Annelida<\/a>, Polychaeta<\/a>","point-score":"10","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This worm has a MOVE of 1 and must feed off of a whale SPECIES card.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Osedax rubiplumus is reported to sustain itself on the bones of dead whales.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Osedax_rubiplumus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/393218\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25932","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDD7E3-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#edd7e3","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/aeious-virus\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Aeiou’s Virus","title-attr":"Aeiou’s Virus","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/478\/19124484011_155fa96351_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on top of any SPECIES card.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> The SPECIES card is immediately discarded.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25931","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DBD3E2-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#dbd3e2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/free-lunch-with-feather\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Free Lunch with Feather","title-attr":"Free Lunch with Feather","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/319\/18934960379_8c33b3f6c4_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card next to any SPECIES cards.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> On the same turn, you can play any card on top of Free Lunch with Feather<\/b> disregarding any compatibility with adjacent SPECIES.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25930","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E0EDDA-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#e0edda","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/chads-reverse-o-tron-shield\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Chad’s Reverse-O-Tron Shield","title-attr":"Chad’s Reverse-O-Tron Shield","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/389\/19121101545_966f3d4c9b_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This card may be played in IMMEDIATE response to any EVENT card.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> Chad’s Reverse-O-Tron Shield deflects any EVENT card and bounces its effects onto your opponent.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25929","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDC1C1-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ddc1c1","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/visit-an-old-friend-with-mimi\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Visit an Old Friend with Mimi","title-attr":"Visit an Old Friend with Mimi","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/418\/18500470053_caa58d21db_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This card can be played immediately for below effect and then discarded.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> You may now rescue one SPECIES card from the discard pile and put it in your hand.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25928","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D2EDC2-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#d2edc2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/kokopellis-flying-pies\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Kokopelli’s Flying Pies","title-attr":"Kokopelli’s Flying Pies","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/525\/19094937666_6518706b5c_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card anywhere on the table.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> This place becomes any TERRAIN of your choosing. Any adjacent cards which are not compatible with this TERRAIN must be immediately discarded.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>musemagkids.com<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/musemagkids.com"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25927","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDC7-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ededc7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/bo-overgrazes\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Bo Overgrazes","title-attr":"Bo Overgrazes","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3676\/19121101345_58066daf3c_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on top of any PLANT SPECIES card.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> The PLANT SPECIES card is immediately discarded.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25926","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E0E0E0-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#e0e0e0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pwt-saves-an-endangered-animal\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"PWT Saves an Endangered Animal","title-attr":"PWT Saves an Endangered Animal","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/466\/19121101295_bf8a550281_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This card can be played immediately after your opponent has placed an EVENT card on top of one of your SPECIES.<\/p>\n

    Effect:<\/strong> Your SPECIES card is protected from the effects of the EVENT card.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25925","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDCB-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ededcb","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/crraws-rhyme-attack\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Crraw’s Rhyme Attack","title-attr":"Crraw’s Rhyme Attack","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/436\/18933385610_da5fe5d59e_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Place this card on top of any one of your opponent’s SPECIES cards.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> If your opponent can not think of a rhyme for this SPECIES within one turn, this SPECIES is discarded.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25924","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-B1C7D8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#b1c7d8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/uranias-meteor-strike\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Urania’s Meteor Strike","title-attr":"Urania’s Meteor Strike","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm4.staticflickr.com\/3815\/18500469883_b71fffa04d_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This card can be played for below effect and then discarded.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> Urania’s Meteor Strike temporarily warms the whole planet. Any SPECIES card on the table that can survive in the “cold” must be immediately discarded.<\/p>\n

    (MUSE deck<\/i><\/a>)<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by MUSE<\/em><\/span>www.musemagkids.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"MUSE","url":"http:\/\/www.musemagkids.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25870","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-forest-forest-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/megatherium\/","excerpt":"Megatherium (\/m\u025b\u0261\u0259\u02c8\u03b8\u026a\u0259ri\u0259m\/ meg-\u0259-theer-ee-\u0259m from the Greek mega [\u03bc\u03ad\u03b3\u03b1\u03c2], meaning “great”, and therion[\u03b8\u03b7\u03c1\u03af\u03bf\u03bd], “beast”) was a genus of elephant-sized ground sloths endemic to South America that lived from the late Pliocene through the end of the Pleistocene.[1] Its size was exceeded by only a few other land mammals, including mammoths and Paraceratherium. The first fossil specimen […]","name-size":"","title":"Megatherium","title-attr":"Megatherium","latin-name":"Megatherium americanum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/274\/18451674273_3731f676ac_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Megatherium<\/i> has a MOVE of 2 and is EXTINCT.
    \n“To my great joy I found the head of some large animal, imbedded in a soft rock. \u2014 It took me nearly 3 hours to get it out: As far as I am able to judge, it is allied to the Rhinoceros.” Darwin, 1832: On finding a Megatherium specimen.<\/i><\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Megatherium","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4471794\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25869","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C5DCE2-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#c5dce2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/beagle-runs-ashore\/","excerpt":"HMS Beagle was a Cherokee-class 10-gun brig-sloop of the Royal Navy, one of more than 100 ships of this class. The vessel, constructed at a cost of \u00a37,803, was launched on 11 May 1820 from the Woolwich Dockyard on the River Thames. In July of that year she took part in a fleet review celebrating […]","name-size":"","title":"Beagle Runs Ashore","title-attr":"Beagle Runs Ashore","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm1.staticflickr.com\/273\/18203766980_40950d1cce_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Can be played at the start of one’s TURN for below effect, and then discarded.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> All other players miss their turn. In effect, the player who uses this card can add an extra three ACTIONS during their TURN.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/HMS_Beagle","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25807","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E5E5E5-fresh-water-fresh-water-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#e5e5e5","border-colour":"#3f912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/chile-darwins-frog\/","excerpt":"The Chile Darwin’s frog (Rhinoderma rufum), also called the Northern Darwin’s frog,[2] is one of only two members of the family Rhinodermatidae. It is endemic to central Chile. The Chile Darwin’s frog has a snout to vent length of about 32\u00a0mm (1.3\u00a0in). It has a fleshy proboscis, slender limbs and feet webbed between the first […]","name-size":"","title":"Chile Darwin\u2019s Frog","title-attr":"Chile Darwin\u2019s Frog","latin-name":"Rhinoderma rufum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8798\/18365101476_2e3fdbe62d_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Amphibia<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This frog has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Chile Darwin’s frog is currently listed as “Critically Endangered” by the IUCN, but as there have been no confirmed sightings since around 1978, it may be EXTINCT.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Chile_Darwin%27s_frog","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/313583\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25789","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#3f912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/fitzroy-dolphin\/","excerpt":"The dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) is a dolphin found in coastal waters in the Southern Hemisphere. Its specific epithet is Latin for “dark” or “dim”. It is very closely genetically related to the Pacific white-sided dolphin, but current scientific consensus holds they are distinct species. \u00a0Charles Darwin also described what turned out to be this […]","name-size":"","title":"Fitzroy Dolphin","title-attr":"Fitzroy Dolphin","latin-name":"Lagenorhynchus obscurus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8777\/17768877374_6d2b35febd_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/1\/13\/DuskyDolphin.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This dolphin has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin described this species as Delphinus fitzroyi<\/i> from a specimen harpooned off Argentina in 1838.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Dusky_dolphin","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/317317\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25741","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BED6AD-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#bed6ad","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/specimen-preservation\/","excerpt":"A zoological specimen is an animal or part of an animal preserved for scientific use. Various uses are: to verify the identity of a (species), to allow study, increase public knowledge of zoology. Zoological specimens are extremely diverse. Examples are bird and mammal study skins, mounted specimens, skeletal material, casts, pinned insects, dried material, animals […]","name-size":"","title":"Specimen Preservation","title-attr":"Specimen Preservation","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8888\/18387414032_f531052e7a_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/b\/b4\/Collection1-nat-museum-berlin_hg.jpg\/640px-Collection1-nat-museum-berlin_hg.jpg","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> You can play this card immediately after your opponent has played an EVENT card “on top” of one of your SPECIES.
    \nEffect:<\/strong> Negates the effect of the EVENT card.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Zoological_specimen","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25735","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EFEFEF-forest-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#efefef","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/darwins-tanager\/","excerpt":"The blue-and-yellow tanager (Pipraeidea bonariensis) is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family, thetanagers. It is found in Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, extreme northern border Chile, andAndean Peru and Ecuador. Some southern region birds migrate northeastwards in the austral winter into eastern Bolivia and northeastern Argentina; also Paraguay where the birds are only […]","name-size":"","title":"Darwin’s Tanager","title-attr":"Darwin’s Tanager","latin-name":"Pipraeidea darwinii","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8854\/18365091016_e2ff2866a4_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Darwin’s Tanager has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Darwin’s Tanager is considered a separate subspecies from the blue and yellow tanager, because it has a green back instead of a black one.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Blue-and-yellow_tanager","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1299131\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25649","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E5E5E5-grasslands-grasslands-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#e5e5e5","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/glyptodon\/","excerpt":"Glyptodon (Greek for “grooved or carved tooth”) was a large, armored mammal of the family Glyptodontidae, a relative of armadillos that lived during the Pleistocene epoch. It was roughly the same size and weight as aVolkswagen Beetle, though flatter in shape. With its rounded, bony shell and squat limbs, it superficially resembled turtles, and the […]","name-size":"","title":"Glyptodon","title-attr":"Glyptodon","latin-name":"Glyptodon Genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7669\/17256038573_571ea5eb13_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Glyptodon has a MOVE of 2 and is EXTINCT
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin described the fossils as “a large animal, with an osseous coat in compartments, very like that of an armadillo.”<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Glyptodon","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4471786\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25650","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C7F9EB-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c7f9eb","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/sand-jellyfish\/","excerpt":"","name-size":"","title":"Sand Jellyfish","title-attr":"Sand Jellyfish","latin-name":"Rhopilema esculentum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm6.staticflickr.com\/5330\/17252920414_4811675539_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Cnidaria<\/a>, Scyphozoa<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This jellyfish has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Sand Jellyfish is edible, and is often served in South East Asian cuisine.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Rhopilema","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1015798\/details","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25590","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDB8B8-urban-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ddb8b8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/northern-rat-flea\/","excerpt":"The northern rat flea (Nosopsyllus fasciatus) is a species of flea found on domestic rats and house mice. Northern rat fleas are external parasites, living by hematophagy off the blood of rodents. It is the most widely spread of its genus, having originated in Europe, but has been transported to temperate regions all over the […]","name-size":"","title":"Northern Rat Flea","title-attr":"Northern Rat Flea","latin-name":"Nosopsyllus fasciatus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8703\/17615125372_bc68fba7f6_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>, Anthropoda<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Northern Rat Flea has a MOVE<\/b> of 2, and must be played adjacent a RODENTIA<\/b> species.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> This flea is also known for being a minor vector for the plague.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by David Orr<\/em><\/span>www.davidorogenic.com\/<\/a><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"David Orr","url":"http:\/\/www.davidorogenic.com\/"},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"urban","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25516","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E0E0E0-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#e0e0e0","border-colour":"#152687","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/bridled-burrfish\/","excerpt":"Chilomycterus antennatus (Bridled burrfish) is a species of fish belonging to the Diodontidae family. It is native to the tropical waters of the Western Atlantic from southeastern Florida and the Bahamas to northern South America. They are also found in the Eastern Atlantic off the cost of Mauritania.[1] C. antennatus has a maximum length of […]","name-size":"","title":"Bridled Burrfish","title-attr":"Bridled Burrfish","latin-name":"Chilomycterus antennatus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8805\/16549103213_dd3fa5a074_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/160.111.248.28\/content\/2009\/05\/19\/14\/54653_orig.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This fish has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> C. antennatus<\/i> has the ability to inflate their body through the swallowing of water or air.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm","temperature-data":["warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Chilomycterus_antennatus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/212843\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25514","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDED-forest-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ededed","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/scalesia-pedunculata\/","excerpt":"Scalesia pedunculata Hook.f. is a member of the Daisy family or Asteraceae, growing to a slender tree (20m tall,DBH 20cm), and found in dense stands on the humid windward coasts of the islands of Santa Cruz, San Cristobal,Santiago and Floreana in the Galapagos Islands. The Galapagos archipelago lies in the southeast trade wind zone, so […]","name-size":"","title":"Scalesia pedunculata","title-attr":"Scalesia pedunculata","latin-name":"Scalesia pedunculata","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7592\/17169271675_2d95cef9c2_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/c\/cb\/Scalesia_pedunculata.jpg\/640px-Scalesia_pedunculata.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Darwin first collected specimens of this species from Santiago Island in October 1835 on the voyage of the Beagle, and it was later named by his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Scalesia_pedunculata","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/5123743\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25467","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F4F4F4-grasslands-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#f4f4f4","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/darwins-rhea\/","excerpt":"The lesser rhea stands at 90\u00a0to 100\u00a0cm (35\u201339\u00a0in) tall. Length is 92\u00a0to 100\u00a0cm (36\u201339\u00a0in) and weight is 15\u00a0to 28.6\u00a0kg (33\u201363\u00a0lb).[2][5] Like most ratites, it has a small head and a small bill, the latter measuring 6.2 to 9.2\u00a0cm (2.4 to 3.6\u00a0in), but has long legs and a long neck. It has relatively larger wings than […]","name-size":"","title":"Darwin’s Rhea","title-attr":"Darwin’s Rhea","latin-name":"Rhea pennata","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7710\/17143359876_5dffbbb50c_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/1\/15\/Rhea_pennata%2C_road_to_Torres_del_Paine.jpg\/640px-Rhea_pennata%2C_road_to_Torres_del_Paine.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Darwin’s Rhea has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin was searching for this bird, and first came across it on his dinner table when Conrad Martens, an artist on board the H.M.S. Beagle, accidentally shot one for a meal.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Darwin%27s_rhea","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/130164\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25336","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDC9-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ededc9","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/rough-seas\/","excerpt":"In oceanography, a sea state is the general condition of the free surface on a large body of water\u2014with respect to wind waves and swell\u2014at a certain location and moment. A sea state is characterized bystatistics, including the wave height, period, and power spectrum. The sea state varies with time, as the wind conditions or […]","name-size":"","title":"Rough Seas","title-attr":"Rough Seas","latin-name":"Event Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8755\/17168677921_414b6a7cbb_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Event<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Can be played at the start of one’s TURN for below effect, and then discarded.
    \nFact:<\/strong> All other players miss their turn. In effect, the player who uses this card can add an extra three ACTIONS during their TURN.<\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Sea_state","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25334","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/octopus\/","excerpt":"An octopus (\/\u02c8\u0252kt\u0259p\u028as\/ or \/\u02c8\u0252kt\u0259p\u0259s\/; plural: octopuses, octopi, or octopodes; see below) is a cephalopod mollusc of the order Octopoda. It has two eyes and four pairs of arms and, like other cephalopods, it is bilaterally symmetric. An octopus has a hard beak, with its mouth at the center point of the arms. An octopus […]","name-size":"","title":"Octopus","title-attr":"Octopus","latin-name":"Octopus genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7622\/16864039947_55dd933574_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/d\/d2\/Octo2.jpg\/640px-Octo2.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Mollusca<\/a>, Cephalopoda<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> An octopus has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin collected many samples along the coast of the Cape Verde Islands, and commented: “I took several specimens of an Octopus, which possessed a most marvellous power of changing its colours; equalling any chamaelion.”<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Octopus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/38592\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25266","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2F2F2-forest-forest-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#f2f2f2","border-colour":"#3f912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/darwins-fox\/","excerpt":"Darwin’s fox or Darwin’s Zorro (Lycalopex fulvipes) is a small critically endangered canine from the genus Lycalopex. It is also known as the Zorro Chilote or Zorro de Darwin[2] in Spanish and lives on Nahuelbuta National Park, (Araucan\u00eda Region), the Valdivian Coastal Range (Los R\u00edos Region) in mainland Chile and Chilo\u00e9 Island.[3] Darwin’s fox was […]","name-size":"","title":"Darwin’s Fox","title-attr":"Darwin’s Fox","latin-name":"Lycalopex fulvipes","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7713\/17070639151_7528fe19ec_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/8\/87\/Pseudalopex_fulvipes.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Darwin’s Fox has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin’s fox was first collected from San Pedro Island off the coast of Chile by the naturalist Charles Darwin in 1834.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Darwin%27s_fox","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/926081\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25265","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-ocean-ocean-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/marine-iguana\/","excerpt":"The marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) is an iguana found only on the Gal\u00e1pagos Islands that has the ability, unique among modern lizards, to forage in the sea, making it a marine reptile. The iguana can dive over 9\u00a0m (30\u00a0ft) into the water. It has spread to all the islands in the archipelago, and is sometimes […]","name-size":"","title":"Marine Iguana","title-attr":"Marine Iguana","latin-name":"Amblyrhynchus cristatus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7692\/17070637301_92cc13a69e_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/a\/a3\/Galapagos_Iguana_02.jpg\/640px-Galapagos_Iguana_02.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Sauropsida<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Marine Iguana has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin was revolted by these creature’s appearance, and referred to them as “Imps of Darkness.”<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Marine_iguana","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/795986\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25263","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-grasslands-tundra-desert-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#8e2820","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/welwitschia\/","excerpt":"Welwitschia is a monotypic gymnosperm genus, comprising solely the very distinct Welwitschia mirabilis. The plant is commonly known simply as Welwitschia, and has various common names in local languages, for example kharos or khurub in Nama, tweeblaarkanniedood in Afrikaans, nyanka inDamara, and onyanga in Herero. It is the only genus of the family Welwitschiaceae and […]","name-size":"","title":"Welwitschia","title-attr":"Welwitschia","latin-name":"Welwitschia mirabilis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7586\/16885161909_fba655cb7a_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/0\/0c\/Welwitschia_mirabilis%282%29.jpg\/640px-Welwitschia_mirabilis%282%29.jpg","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Gnetophyta<\/a>, Gnetopsida<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> The age of individual plants is difficult to assess, but they are very long-lived, living 1000 years or more.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Welwitschia","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25207","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2F2F2-forest-forest-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#f2f2f2","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/satureja-darwinii\/","excerpt":"Clinopodium is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae. It is in the tribe Mentheae of the subfamilyNepetoideae, but little else can be said with certainty about its phylogenetic position. The genus name Clinopodium is derived from the Latin clinopodion or the Greek klinopodion. These were names forClinopodium vulgare. The Greek klino means […]","name-size":"","title":"Satureja darwinii","title-attr":"Satureja darwinii","latin-name":"Clinopodium darwinii","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8701\/16371673984_2e11fa619c_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Darwin writes: “Very sweet smelling, plant; with a rather biting aromatic taste; used for making tea by the seamen.”<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Clinopodium","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/5370094\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25206","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2F2F2-grasslands-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#f2f2f2","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/floreana-mockingbird\/","excerpt":"The Floreana mockingbird or Charles mockingbird (Mimus trifasciatus) is a bird species in the family Mimidae. It is endemic to Floreana, one of the Gal\u00e1pagos Islands of Ecuador; at present it only occurs on offshore islets however. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. The Floreana mockingbird is also known as Darwin’s mockingbird, […]","name-size":"","title":"Floreana Mockingbird","title-attr":"Floreana Mockingbird","latin-name":"Mimus trifasciatus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8738\/16369894134_d0f5215a3a_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Floreana Mockingbird has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Floreana Mockingbird is critically endangered and is on the brink of extinction.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Floreana_mockingbird","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25198","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDED-forest-forest-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#ededed","border-colour":"#152687","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/geonoma-schottiana\/","excerpt":"Geonoma is a genus of small to medium-sized palms native to the forest understorey of tropical Central and South America. This palm genus is one of the largest in the Neotropics.[1] Its 64 species are distributed from Mexico andHaiti in the north to Paraguay in the south; two are found in the insular Caribbean.[2] The […]","name-size":"","title":"Geonoma schottiana","title-attr":"Geonoma schottiana","latin-name":"Arecaceae geonoma schottiana","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8740\/16782628580_771ce12e84_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Monocots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    FACT:<\/b> Specimens of this plant were collected by Darwin at Bahia (Salvador) in March 1832.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Geonoma","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1100163\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25194","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2F2F2-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#f2f2f2","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/galapagos-sea-lion\/","excerpt":"The Gal\u00e1pagos sea lion (Zalophus wollebaeki) is a species of sea lion that exclusively breeds on theGal\u00e1pagos Islands and \u2013 in smaller numbers \u2013 on Isla de la Plata (Ecuador). Being fairly social, and one of the most numerous species in the Gal\u00e1pagos archipelago, they are often spotted sun-bathing on sandy shores or rock groups […]","name-size":"","title":"Galapagos sea lion","title-attr":"Galapagos sea lion","latin-name":"Zalophus wollebaeki","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8706\/16750059397_d47825efe2_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/e\/e9\/Zalophus_wollebaeki_up_close.jpg\/640px-Zalophus_wollebaeki_up_close.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This sea lion has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Their loud bark, playful nature, and graceful agility in water make them the “welcoming party” of the Galapagos Islands.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Gal%C3%A1pagos_sea_lion","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1052725\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25179","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-forest-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#59560b","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/aeronaut-spider\/","excerpt":"Ballooning, sometimes called kiting, is a behaviour in which spiders and some other invertebrates use air-borne dispersal to move between locations.[1][2] A spider (usually limited to individuals of a small species), or spiderling after hatching,[3] will climb as high as it can, stand on raised legs with its abdomen pointed upwards (“tiptoeing”),[4] and then release […]","name-size":"","title":"Aeronaut Spider","title-attr":"Aeronaut Spider","latin-name":"Parasteatoda tepidariorum","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8724\/16916333996_8f93e1c864_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Arachnida<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> These spiders have a FLIGHT of 2.
    \n“How inexplicable is the cause which induces these small insects, as it now appears in both hemispheres, to undertake their aerial excursions.”<\/i> ~Darwin (Oct 31, 1832)<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ballooning_%28spider%29","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1186736\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25191","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C5E0C7-forest-grasslands-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#c5e0c7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/dragonfly-3\/","excerpt":"A dragonfly is an insect belonging to the suborder Anisoptera (from Greek \u03b1\u03bd\u03b9\u03c3\u03bf\u03c2 anisos, “uneven” + \u03c0\u03c4\u03b5\u03c1\u03bf\u03c2 pteros, “wings”, because the hindwing is broader than the forewing). It is characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, sometimes with coloured patches, and an elongated body. Dragonflies can be mistaken for the related […]","name-size":"","title":"Dragonfly","title-attr":"Dragonfly","latin-name":"Anisoptera Infraorder","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7639\/16300876863_b2e6bd1e5f_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Dragonfly has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> In general, large dragonflies have a maximum speed of 10 to 15 metres per second (22 to 34 mph.)<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Caspar & Merian (1718)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Caspar & Merian (1718)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"forest","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Dragonfly","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2762968\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25190","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-B7CACC-fresh-water-fresh-water-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#b7cacc","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/phytoplankton-4\/","excerpt":"Desmids (Gr. desmos, bond or chain) are an order (Desmidiales) in the Charophyta, a division of green algae that forms a sister group to the land plants (Embryophyta).[1] The desmids are often treated as members of the Zygnematales, as family Desmidiaceae.[2][3] The Desmidiales comprise around 40 genera and 5,000[4] to 6,000[5] species, found mostly but […]","name-size":"","title":"Phytoplankton","title-attr":"Phytoplankton","latin-name":"Desmidiales Order","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7282\/16894965406_32f5b8c4c9_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Zygnemophyceae<\/a>, Charophyta<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> Desmids are a type of green algae. They assume a veriety of highly symmetrical and attractive shapes. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Ernst Haeckel<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Ernst Haeckel","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"fresh-water","habitat-2":"fresh-water","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Desmidiales","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/6059706\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25189","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDDDDD-fresh-water-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#dddddd","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/phytoplankton-3\/","excerpt":"Diatoms[5] are a major group of algae, and are among the most common types ofphytoplankton. Most diatoms are unicellular, although they can exist as colonies in the shape of filaments or ribbons (e.g. Fragilaria), fans (e.g. Meridion), zigzags (e.g. Tabellaria), or stars (e.g. Asterionella). Diatoms are producers within the food chain. A unique feature of […]","name-size":"","title":"Phytoplankton","title-attr":"Phytoplankton","latin-name":"Diatom Order","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8704\/16734709719_81c64f52b4_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Chromalveolata<\/a>, Heterokontophyta<\/a>, Bacillariophyceae<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> Diatoms belong to a large group called the heterokonts, including both autotrophs<\/i> and heterotrophs<\/i><\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Ernst Haeckel (1904)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Ernst Haeckel (1904)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"fresh-water","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Diatom","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/3685\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25188","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BAD6A7-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#bad6a7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/robin\/","excerpt":"The European robin (Erithacus rubecula), most commonly known in AnglophoneEurope simply as the robin, is a small insectivorous passerine bird, specifically achat, that was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family (Turdidae), but is now considered to be an Old World flycatcher. Around 12.5\u201314.0\u00a0cm (5.0\u20135.5\u00a0in) in length, the male and female are similar […]","name-size":"","title":"Robin","title-attr":"Robin","latin-name":"Erithacus rubecula","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8719\/16300871833_3a06cc7227_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Robin has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b>bThe avian magnetic compass of the robin has been extensively researched and uses Vision Based Magnetoreception.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by W.Swaysland (1883)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"W.Swaysland (1883)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/European_robin","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1051567\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25187","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C0D3C9-forest-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#c0d3c9","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/red-squirrels\/","excerpt":"The red squirrel or Eurasian red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) is a species of tree squirrel in the genus Sciurus common throughout Eurasia. The red squirrel is anarboreal, omnivorous rodent. In Great Britain, Italy and Ireland, numbers have decreased drastically in recent years, a decline associated with the introduction of the eastern grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) […]","name-size":"","title":"Red Squirrels","title-attr":"Red Squirrels","latin-name":"Sciurus Vulgaris","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8684\/16919895721_1e0e7a2807_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"5","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Red Squirrel has a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> In Great Britain, Italy and Ireland, numbers have decreased drastically in recent years.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Angel Cabrera (1922)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Angel Cabrera (1922)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"forest","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Red_squirrel","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1037909\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25185","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D1C79C-forest-grasslands-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#d1c79c","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/large-earth-bumblebee-2\/","excerpt":"Bombus terrestris, the buff-tailed bumblebee or large earth bumblebee is one of the most numerous bumblebee species in Europe. Bombus terrestris is the largest of the bumblebee species.[1] Bombus terrestris is one of the main species used in greenhouse pollination, and consequently can be found in many countries and areas where it is not native; […]","name-size":"","title":"Large Earth Bumblebee","title-attr":"Large Earth Bumblebee","latin-name":"Bombus terrestris","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8705\/16298508334_705a3be82b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>, Anthropoda<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> This Bumblebee has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The Large Earth Bumblebee can navigate its way back to the nest from a distance as far away as 8 miles.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stewart (ca 1840)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stewart (ca 1840)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"forest","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Bombus_terrestris","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1177347\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25184","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E5DDA7-forest-grasslands-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#e5dda7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/european-honey-bee-3\/","excerpt":"The western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. The genus name Apis is Latin for “bee”, and mellifera means “honey-bearing”. As of October 28, 2006, the Honey Bee Genome Sequencing Consortium fully sequenced and analyzed the genome of Apis mellifera. Since 2007, attention has been devoted to […]","name-size":"","title":"European Honey Bee","title-attr":"European Honey Bee","latin-name":"Apis Melifera","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7626\/16919898341_a52ff42029_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>, Anthropoda<\/a>","point-score":"5","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The European Honey Bee has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> THe Honey Bee Genome Sequencing Consortium fully sequenced and analyzed the genome of Apis me;;ifera<\/i> in 2006.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Stewart (1840)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Stewart (1840)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"forest","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Western_honey_bee","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1045608\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25183","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BFBFBF-ocean-ocean-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#bfbfbf","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/copepoda\/","excerpt":"Copepods (\/\u02c8ko\u028ap\u026ap\u0252d\/; meaning “oar-feet”) are a group of small crustaceans found in the sea and nearly every freshwater habitat. Some species are planktonic (drifting in sea waters), some are benthic (living on the ocean floor), and some continental species may live in limno-terrestrial habitats and other wet terrestrial places, such as swamps, under leaf fall […]","name-size":"","title":"Copepoda","title-attr":"Copepoda","latin-name":"Subclass","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"3","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8741\/16298510494_d6681b6568_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Maxillopoda<\/a>, Anthropod<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Copepoda have a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Copepods are major ZOOPLANKTON<\/b><\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Ernst Haeckel<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Ernst Haeckel","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"ocean","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Copepod","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/2625033\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25182","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D7E2EA-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#d7e2ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-chaffinch-2\/","excerpt":"The common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), usually known simply as the chaffinch, is a common and widespread small passerine bird in the finch family. The male is brightly coloured with a blue-grey cap and rust-red underparts. The female is much duller in colouring but both sexes have two contrasting white wings-bars and white sides to the […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Chaffinch","title-attr":"Common Chaffinch","latin-name":"Fringilia coelebs","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8715\/16733229028_d388590456_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Chaffinch has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The Chaffinch’s powerful song is very well known, and its fink<\/i> or vink<\/i> sounding call gives the finch family its English name.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Thomas Lord (1791)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Thomas Lord (1791)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Common_chaffinch","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/919235\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25175","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E5E5E5-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#e5e5e5","border-colour":"#8e2820","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/coral\/","excerpt":"Anthozoa is a class within the phylum Cnidaria. Unlike other cnidarians, anthozoans do not have a medusastage in their development. Instead, they release sperm and eggs that form a planula, which attaches to somesubstrate on which the cnidarian grows. Some anthozoans can also reproduce asexually through budding. More than 6,100 species have been described.[1] The […]","name-size":"","title":"Coral","title-attr":"Coral","latin-name":"Anthozoa class","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8703\/16754066599_3d02299e3d_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/0\/02\/Diploria_Strigosa.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Cnidaria<\/a>, Anthozoa<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Anthozoa is a suspension feeder and must be played adjacent to a 1 PLANKTON species.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin’s The Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs, Being the first part of the geology of the voyage of the Beagle, under the command of Capt. Fitzroy, R.N. during the years 1832 to 1836<\/i>, was published in 1842.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Anthozoa","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1746\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25157","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E0E0E0-forest-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#e0e0e0","border-colour":"#000000","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/clouded-yellow\/","excerpt":"Colias is a genus of butterflies in the family Pieridae. They are usually called clouded yellows; the North American name “sulphurs” is elsewhere used for Coliadinae in general. The closest living relative is the genusZerene,[4] which is sometimes included in Colias. This genus occurs throughout the Holarctic, including the arctic regions. They are also found […]","name-size":"","title":"Clouded Yellow","title-attr":"Clouded Yellow","latin-name":"Colias genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8745\/16746971389_0e0c1b4700_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/0\/03\/Clouded_yellow_%28Colias_croceus%29.jpg\/640px-Clouded_yellow_%28Colias_croceus%29.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Insecta<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Clouded Yellows have a FLIGHT of 2, and need to feed off a flowering PLANTAE species.
    \nFact:<\/strong> This genus occurs throughout the Northern hemisphere, and is also found in South America, Africa, China and India.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Colias","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/19952\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25156","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DBDBDB-grasslands-forest-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#dbdbdb","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/galapagos-hawk\/","excerpt":"The Galapagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis) is a large hawk endemic to the Galapagos Islands. Similar in size to the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and the Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swainsoni) of North America, but the size is variable across the islands as is recorded for many animals native to the Galapagos. The Galapagos hawk can range […]","name-size":"","title":"Galapagos Hawk","title-attr":"Galapagos Hawk","latin-name":"Buteo galapagoensis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7603\/16310542504_7f8f91d814_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/8\/84\/Galapagos_hawk.jpg\/640px-Galapagos_hawk.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This hawk has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Darwin on the hawk: “A gun is here almost superfluous; for with the muzzle I pushed a hawk out of the branch of a tree…”<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Galapagos_hawk","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1048442\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25152","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DCE1E8-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#dce1e8","border-colour":"#152687","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/flying-fish\/","excerpt":"The Exocoetidae are a family of marine fish in the order Beloniformes of class Actinopterygii. Fish of this family are known as flying fish. About 64 species are grouped in seven to nine genera. Flying fish can make powerful, self-propelled leaps out of water into air, where their long, wing-like fins enable gliding flight for […]","name-size":"","title":"Flying Fish","title-attr":"Flying Fish","latin-name":"Exocoetidae Family","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7587\/16928861862_502e639556_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/8\/84\/Pink-wing_flying_fish.jpg\/553px-Pink-wing_flying_fish.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This fish has a MOVE of 2 and needs to be played next to a PLANKTON species (for food).
    \nFact:<\/strong> The flights of flying fish are typically around 50 meters, though they can use updrafts at the leading edge of waves to cover distances of up to 400 meters!<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Flying_fish","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/8245\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25149","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EAF4E3-forest-forest-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#eaf4e3","border-colour":"#3f912d","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/monkey-puzzle-tree\/","excerpt":"Araucaria araucana (commonly called the monkey puzzle tree, monkey tail tree, Chilean pine, orpehu\u00e9n) is an evergreen tree growing to 40\u00a0m (130\u00a0ft) tall with a 2-m (7-ft) trunk diameter. The tree is native to central and southern Chile and western Argentina.[1] Araucaria araucana is the hardiest species in theconifer genus Araucaria. Because of the great […]","name-size":"","title":"Monkey Puzzle Tree","title-attr":"Monkey Puzzle Tree","latin-name":"Araucaria araucana","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8694\/16740314580_ae4265e086_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/3\/37\/Araucaria_araucana-branch.JPG\/640px-Araucaria_araucana-branch.JPG","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Pinophyta<\/a>, Pinopsida<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> Because of the great age of this species, it is sometimes described as a living fossil.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Araucaria_araucana","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1034857\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25148","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDD7E2-grasslands-grasslands-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ddd7e2","border-colour":"#75004c","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/galapagos-giant-tortoise\/","excerpt":"The Gal\u00e1pagos tortoise or Gal\u00e1pagos giant tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra) is the largest living species oftortoise and the 14th-heaviest living reptile. Modern giant tortoises can weigh up to 250\u00a0kg; even larger versions, now extinct, roamed every continent except Antarctica and Australia into the Pleistocene (<1.8 million years ago). Today, they exist only on two remote archipelagos: […]","name-size":"","title":"Galapagos giant tortoise","title-attr":"Galapagos giant tortoise","latin-name":"Chelonoidis nigra","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7605\/16713959497_65d0a7bfa1_o_d.jpg","photo":"http:\/\/upload.wikimedia.org\/wikipedia\/commons\/thumb\/5\/54\/Galapagos_Tortoise_%285213306875%29.jpg\/640px-Galapagos_Tortoise_%285213306875%29.jpg","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Sauropsida<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This tortoise has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Charles Darwin visited the Gal\u00e1pagos for five weeks on the second voyage of HMS Beagle in 1835 and saw Gal\u00e1pagos tortoises on San Cristobal (Chatham) and Santiago (James) Islands.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm, hot","temperature-data":["warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Gal%C3%A1pagos_tortoise","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/794300\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25145","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D2DDF2-grasslands-tundra-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#d2ddf2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/snowy-old\/","excerpt":"The snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. This yellow-eyed, black-beaked white bird is easily recognizable. It is 52\u201371\u00a0cm (20\u201328\u00a0in) long, with a 125\u2013150\u00a0cm (49\u201359\u00a0in) wingspan. Also, these owls can weigh anywhere from 1.6 to 3\u00a0kg (3.5 to 6.6\u00a0lb).[4] It is one of the largest species of owl […]","name-size":"","title":"Snowy Old","title-attr":"Snowy Old","latin-name":"Bubo scandiacus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7630\/16298043304_1cb56a28aa_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Snowy Owl has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The Snowy Owl is one of the largest species of owl and, in North America, is on average the heaviest owl species.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool","temperature-data":["cold","cool"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Heath (1808)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Heath (1808)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"tundra","habitat-3":"tundra","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Snowy_owl","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1036388\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25144","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-A8B4BF-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#a8b4bf","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-shrew\/","excerpt":"The common shrew (Sorex araneus) or Eurasian shrew is the most common shrew, and one of the most common mammals, throughout Northern Europe, including Great Britain, but excludingIreland. It is 55\u201382 millimetres (2.2\u20133.2\u00a0in) long and weighs 5\u201312 grams (0.2\u20130.4\u00a0oz), and has velvety dark brown fur with a pale underside. Juvenile shrews have lighter fur until […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Shrew","title-attr":"Common Shrew","latin-name":"Sorex araneus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7282\/16300414513_79b9c1794b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Common Shrew has a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> Shrews need to consume 200-300% of their body weight each day in order to survive. A shrew must eat every two to three hours to achieve this goal.<\/p>\n","temperature":"warm","temperature-data":["warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Victor Fatio (1869-1905)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Victor Fatio (1869-1905)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Common_shrew","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/124497\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25143","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BBD6A9-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#bbd6a9","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/european-garden-spider-2\/","excerpt":"“Cross spider” redirects here. For spiders noted for their web markings (stabilimenta), see Argiope (spider). The spider species Araneus diadematus is commonly called the European garden spider,diadem spider, cross spider, or crowned orb weaver. It is an orb-weaver spider found inEurope and North America. (From Wikipedia, March 2015)","name-size":"","title":"European Garden Spider","title-attr":"European Garden Spider","latin-name":"Araneus diadematus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8755\/16713105937_147cfe4353_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Arthropoda<\/a>, Arachnida<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The European Spider has a MOVE of 1.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The third pair of legs the garden spiders are specialized for assisting in the spinning of orb webs.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Emst Haeckel (1904)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Emst Haeckel (1904)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Araneus_diadematus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1194185\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25142","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C6CBD3-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#c6cbd3","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/dunnock-2\/","excerpt":"The dunnock (Prunella modularis) is a small passerine, or perching bird, found throughout temperate Europe and into Asia. It is by far the most widespread member of the accentor family, which otherwise consists of mountain species. Other common names of the dunnock include thehedge accentor, hedge sparrow, or hedge warbler. The name “dunnock” comes from […]","name-size":"","title":"Dunnock","title-attr":"Dunnock","latin-name":"Prunella modularis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7629\/16734248259_40433f53fb_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Dunnock has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The name “Dunnock” comes from the ancient british dunn\u0101kos<\/i>, meaning “little brown one.”<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by H. Gronvold (1907-08)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"H. Gronvold (1907-08)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Dunnock","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/918161\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25141","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C5D8E8-grasslands-grasslands-tundra-1.png","card-colour":"#c5d8e8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/peregrine-falcon-2\/","excerpt":"The peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), also known as the peregrine,[2] and historically as theduck hawk in North America,[3] is a widespread bird of prey in the family Falconidae. A large, crow-sized falcon, it has a blue-grey back, barred white underparts, and a black head and “moustache”. As is typical of bird-eating raptors, peregrine falcons are […]","name-size":"","title":"Peregrine Falcon","title-attr":"Peregrine Falcon","latin-name":"Falco peregrinus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8696\/16298044374_870ba49e94_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"6","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Peregrine Falcon has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The peregrine is renowned for its speed, reaching over 200 mph during its characteristic hunting stoop (high speed dive,) making it the fastest member of the animal kingdon.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by J.F. Naumann (1905)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"J.F. Naumann (1905)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"tundra","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Peregrine_falcon","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1049164\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25140","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C5D6EA-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#c5d6ea","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-blackbird-2\/","excerpt":"The common blackbird (Turdus merula) is a species of true thrush. It is also called\u00a0Eurasian blackbird (especially in North America, to distinguish it from the unrelatedNew World blackbirds),[2] or simply blackbird where this does not lead to confusion with a similar-looking local species. It breeds in Europe, Asia, and North Africa, and has been\u00a0introduced to […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Blackbird","title-attr":"Common Blackbird","latin-name":"Turdus merula","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7590\/16920440425_4311395ee1_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Blackbird has a FLIGHT of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/b> The Common Blackbird was described by lInnaues in the 10th edition of his Systema Naturae<\/i> in 1758.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by J.F. Naumann (1905)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"J.F. Naumann (1905)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Common_blackbird","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1177498\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25139","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-D5E1EF-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#d5e1ef","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-raven-3\/","excerpt":"The common raven (Corvus corax), also known as the northern raven, is a large all-blackpasserine bird. Found across the Northern Hemisphere, it is the most widely distributed of all corvids. There are at least eight subspecies with little variation in appearance, although recent research has demonstrated significant genetic differences among populations from various regions. It […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Raven","title-attr":"Common Raven","latin-name":"Corvus corax","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8745\/16894506676_c02bc8bca3_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Raven has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/b> Some remarkable feats of problem-solving have been observed in the species, leading to the belief that it is highly intelligent<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by J.J. Audubon (1827-38)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"J.J. Audubon (1827-38)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Common_raven","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1177364\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25138","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CAD8C7-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#cad8c7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/european-badger-2\/","excerpt":"The European badger (Meles meles) is a species of badger in the family Mustelidae and is native to almost all of Europe and some parts of the Middle East. Several subspecies are recognised; the nominate subspecies (Meles meles meles) predominates over most of Europe. The European badger is classified as being of Least Concern by […]","name-size":"","title":"European Badger","title-attr":"European Badger","latin-name":"Meles meles","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7634\/16300416703_02cb3e766a_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The European Badger has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/b>The European Badger can become torpid (a kind of temporary hibernation) for two or so days at a time.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by R. Lydekker<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"R. Lydekker","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/European_badger","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/328046\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25136","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C4D6B8-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#c4d6b8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/wild-daffodil-2\/","excerpt":"Narcissus pseudonarcissus (commonly known as wild daffodil or Lent lily) is a perennial flowering plant.[1][2][3][4][5][6] This species has pale yellow flowers, with a darker central trumpet. The long, narrow leaves are slightly greyish green in colour and rise from the base of the stem. The plant grows from a bulb. The flowers produce seeds, which […]","name-size":"","title":"Wild Daffodil","title-attr":"Wild Daffodil","latin-name":"Narcissus pseudonarcissus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7648\/16731302198_462c241ddf_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Magnoliophyta<\/a>, Lilopsida<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> In Britain native populations have decreased substantially since the 19th century due to intensification of agriculture, clearance of woodland and uprooting of the bulbs for use in gardens. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by John Curtis (1836)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"John Curtis (1836)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Narcissus_pseudonarcissus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1004074\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25135","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C8DBB3-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#c8dbb3","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/scots-pine\/","excerpt":"Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is a species of pine that is native to Europe and Asia, ranging from western Europe to eastern Siberia, south to the Caucasus Mountains and Anatolia, and north to well inside the Arctic Circle in Scandinavia. In the north of its range, it occurs from sea level to 1,000 m, […]","name-size":"","title":"Scots Pine","title-attr":"Scots Pine","latin-name":"Pinus sylvestris","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7610\/16918972275_8b2a24228b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Pinophyta<\/a>, Pinopsida<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> In Britain it now occurs naturally only in Scotland, but historical and archaeological records indicate that it also one occured in Wales and England.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by O. W. Thom\u00e9 (1885)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"O. W. Thom\u00e9 (1885)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Scots_pine","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1059929\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25134","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DAE4F2-tundra-forest-grasslands-1.png","card-colour":"#dae4f2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/red-fox-4\/","excerpt":"The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the largest of the true foxes and the most abundant member of theCarnivora, being present across the entire Northern Hemisphere from the Arctic Circle to North Africa, Central America and Asia. It is listed as Least Concern by the IUCN.[1] Its range has increased alongside human expansion, having been […]","name-size":"","title":"Red Fox","title-attr":"Red Fox","latin-name":"Vulpes vulpes","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7586\/16731540990_4c69aa864e_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> The Red Fox has a MOVE of 2. Can also be played on Urban.
    \nFact:<\/b> THe earliest fossil specimens of V.vulpules<\/i> were uncovered in Barany, Hungary dating from between 3.4 and 1.8 million years ago. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Unknown (cc 1880's)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Unknown (cc 1880's)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"tundra","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"grasslands","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Red_fox","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/328609\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25133","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DAEDBB-grasslands-urban-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#daedbb","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/oxeye-daisy-2\/","excerpt":"Leucanthemum vulgare, the ox-eye daisy[2] or oxeye daisy,[3] is a widespread flowering plant native to Europe and the temperate regions of Asia and an introduced plant to North America, Australia and New Zealand. It is one of a number of Asteraceae family plants to be called a “daisy”, and has the vernacular names common daisy, […]","name-size":"","title":"Oxeye Daisy","title-attr":"Oxeye Daisy","latin-name":"Leucanthemum vulgare","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8711\/16711638247_bab2ed127d_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/b> The Oxeye Daisy is considered an invasive species in many parts of the world. It is difficult to control or eradicate, since a new plant can regenerate from rhizome fragments.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Mentz and Ostenfeld (1917-27)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Mentz and Ostenfeld (1917-27)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"urban","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Leucanthemum_vulgare","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"eol.org\/pages\/482333\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25132","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C7D6C0-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#c7d6c0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-dandelion-2\/","excerpt":"Taraxacum officinale, the common dandelion (often simply called “dandelion“), is a floweringherbaceous perennial plant of the family Asteraceae (Compositae). It can be found growing in temperateregions of the world, in lawns, on roadsides, on disturbed banks and shores of water ways, and other areas with moist soils. T. officinale is considered a weed, especially in […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Dandelion","title-attr":"Common Dandelion","latin-name":"Taraxacum officinale","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8751\/16731541160_04391869bb_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> T. officinale<\/i> is considered a weed, especially in lawns and along roadsides, but it is sometimes used as a medical herb and in food preparation.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by W. Kilburn (1777-98)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"W. Kilburn (1777-98)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Taraxacum_officinale","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/578234\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25130","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCCB1-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#ddccb1","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/blue-tit\/","excerpt":"The Eurasian blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus[2] or Parus caeruleus[3]) is a small passerine bird in the titfamily Paridae. The bird is easily recognisable by its blue and yellow plumage, but various authorities dispute their scientific classification. Eurasian blue tits, usually resident and non-migratory birds, are widespread and a common resident breeder throughout temperate and subarctic […]","name-size":"","title":"Blue Tit","title-attr":"Blue Tit","latin-name":"Cyanistes caeruleus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8727\/16918972625_e733c2e264_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Blue Tit has a FLIGHT of 2. Can be played next to any TERRAIN.
    \nFact:<\/strong> While most authorities treat the Blue Tit as a subgenus of Paras, the British Omithologists’ Union treats Cyanistes<\/i> as a distinct genus.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by H. Gr\u00f6nvold (1907)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"H. Gr\u00f6nvold (1907)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Eurasian_blue_tit","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1051997\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25129","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C5D6C5-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#c5d6c5","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/apple-tree-2\/","excerpt":"The apple tree (Malus domestica) is a deciduous tree in the rose family best known for its sweet,pomaceous fruit, the apple. It is cultivated worldwide as a fruit tree, and is the most widely grown species in the genus Malus. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found […]","name-size":"","title":"Apple Tree","title-attr":"Apple Tree","latin-name":"Malus Domestica","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7609\/16720905228_d26a5d8b1b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> There is genetic proof that Malus sieversii is the wild ancestor of the domestic apple.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by O. W. Thom\u00e9 (1884)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"O. W. Thom\u00e9 (1884)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Apple","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/629094\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25128","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BDD6AF-grasslands-forest-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#bdd6af","border-colour":"#000000","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/buttercup\/","excerpt":"Ranunculus \/r\u00e6\u02c8n\u028c\u014bkj\u028al\u0259s\/[1] is a large genus of about 600 species of plants in the Ranunculaceae. Members of the genus include the buttercups, spearworts, water crowfoots and the lesser celandine. The petals are often highly lustrous, especially in yellow species. Buttercups usually flower in the spring, but flowers may be found throughout the summer, especially where […]","name-size":"","title":"Buttercup","title-attr":"Buttercup","latin-name":"Ranunculus acris","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8703\/16701243987_09410a6303_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Magnoliophyta<\/a>, Magnoliopsida<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> All Ranunculus<\/i> species are poisonous when eaten fresh by cattle, horses, and other livestock.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by unknown (Edited by A. Mentz, 1917-27)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"unknown (Edited by A. Mentz, 1917-27)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ranunculus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/37662\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25127","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CDD6CB-fresh-water-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#cdd6cb","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/duckweed\/","excerpt":"Duckweeds, or water lens, are flowering aquatic plants which float on or just beneath the surface of still or slow-moving bodies of fresh water and wetlands. Also known as “bayroot,” they arose from within the arum or aroid family (Araceae),[1] and therefore, often are classified as the subfamily Lemnoideae within the Araceae. Classifications created prior […]","name-size":"","title":"Duckweed","title-attr":"Duckweed","latin-name":"Lemnoideae subfamily","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"4","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7602\/16286198504_1a03767d85_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Monocots<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Duckweed is an important high protein food source for waterfowl. As it contains more protein than soybeans, it is often cited as a potential human food source. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Edward Step (1895)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Edward Step (1895)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"fresh-water","habitat-2":"fresh-water","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Lemnoideae","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/10553303\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25126","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CED6C9-grasslands-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#ced6c9","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/himalayan-blackberry-2\/","excerpt":"Rubus armeniacus, Armenian Blackberry or Himalayan Blackberry, is a species of Rubus in theblackberry group Rubus subgenus Rubus series Discolores (P.J. M\u00fcll.) Focke. It is native to Armenia and Northern Iran, and widely naturalised elsewhere. Both its scientific name and origin have been the subject of much confusion, with much of the literature using one […]","name-size":"","title":"Himalayan Blackberry","title-attr":"Himalayan Blackberry","latin-name":"Rubus armeniacus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8721\/16720902008_943a7d7b5b_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Native to Armenia and Northern Iran, the species was introduced to Europe in 1835 and to Australasia and North America in 1885.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by F.W. van Eeden (1893)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"F.W. van Eeden (1893)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Rubus_armeniacus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/43619214\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25125","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E2E8DE-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#e2e8de","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/kelp\/","excerpt":"Kelps are large seaweeds (algae) belonging to the brown algae (Phaeophyceae) in the orderLaminariales. There are about 30 different genera.[citation needed] Kelp grows in underwater “forests” (kelp forests) in shallow oceans, and is thought to have appeared in the Miocene, 23 to 5 million years ago.[2] The organisms require nutrient-rich water with temperatures between 6 […]","name-size":"","title":"Kelp","title-attr":"Kelp","latin-name":"Laminaria genus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7613\/16288555163_49e1fabc12_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Kelp grows in underwater “forests” (kelp forests) in shallow oceans. <\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Marc Pietro (1829)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Marc Pietro (1829)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"ocean","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Kelp","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/10422\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25124","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CED6C9-grasslands-forest-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ced6c9","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/meadowsweet\/","excerpt":"Filipendula ulmaria, commonly known as meadowsweet[1] or mead wort,[2] is a perennial herb in the family Rosaceae that grows in damp meadows. It is native throughout most of Europe and Western Asia(Near east and Middle east). It has been introduced and naturalised in North America. Juncus subnodulosus–Cirsium palustre fen-meadow and Purple moor grass and rush […]","name-size":"","title":"Meadowsweet","title-attr":"Meadowsweet","latin-name":"Filipendula ulmaria","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8715\/16907314762_3b7c2cc3e0_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> It is known by many other names, and in Chaucer’s “The Knight’s Tale,” it is known as Meadwort.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Jacob Sturm (1796)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Jacob Sturm (1796)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Filipendula_ulmaria","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/629935\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25123","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CCD6C5-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#ccd6c5","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/pedunculate-oak-2\/","excerpt":"Quercus robur is commonly known as the English oak or pedunculate oak or French oak. It is nativeto most of Europe, and to Anatolia to the Caucasus, and also to parts of North Africa. Quercus robur is a large deciduous tree, with circumference of grand oaks from 4\u00a0m (13\u00a0ft) to exceptional 12\u00a0m (39\u00a0ft).[citation needed] The […]","name-size":"","title":"Pedunculate Oak","title-attr":"Pedunculate Oak","latin-name":"Quercus robur","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8729\/16720901248_db379af688_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>, Angiosperm<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> Quercus robur is a large deciduous tree, and is also known as the English Oak.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by O.W. Thome (1884)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"O.W. Thome (1884)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Quercus_robur","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1151323\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25122","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CDD6C7-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#cdd6c7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/woodland-strawberry\/","excerpt":"Fragaria vesca, commonly called wild strawberry, woodland strawberry, Alpine strawberry, European strawberry, or fraise des bois, is a perennial herbaceous plant that grows naturally throughout much of theNorthern Hemisphere, and that produces edible fruits. Typical habitat is along trails and roadsides, embankments, hillsides, stone- and gravel-laid paths and roads, meadows, young woodlands, sparse forest, woodland […]","name-size":"","title":"Woodland Strawberry","title-attr":"Woodland Strawberry","latin-name":"Fragaria vesca","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7655\/16722392009_2843bf5d90_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> It is also used as a genetic model plant for the garden strawberry and the Rosaceae family in general.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by O.W. Thome (1885)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"O.W. Thome (1885)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Fragaria_vesca","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/229659\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25121","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDDA-fresh-water-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ededda","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/northern-pike-2\/","excerpt":"The northern pike (Esox lucius), known simply as a pike in Britain, Ireland, most of Canada, and most parts of the USA, (also called jackfish or simply “northern” in the Upper Midwest of the USA and inManitoba, Canada), is a species of carnivorous fish of the genus Esox (the pikes). They are typical ofbrackish and […]","name-size":"","title":"Northern Pike","title-attr":"Northern Pike","latin-name":"Esox lucius","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8646\/16830832216_bfd2f09e88_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Northern Pike has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Northern Pike gets its name from its resemblance to the pole-weapon known as the pike (from the Middle English for pointed).<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool","temperature-data":["cold","cool"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by W.H. Lizars (1843)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"W.H. Lizars (1843)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"fresh-water","habitat-2":"fresh-water","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Northern_pike","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/206652\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25120","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2F2F2-fresh-water-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#f2f2f2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/atlantic-salmon\/","excerpt":"The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is a salmon in the family Salmonidae. It is found in the northern Atlantic Ocean, in rivers that flow into the north Atlantic and, due to human introduction, in the north Pacific.[2][3] Other names used to reference Atlantic salmon are: bay salmon, black salmon, caplin-scull salmon, Sebago salmon, silver salmon, […]","name-size":"","title":"Atlantic Salmon","title-attr":"Atlantic Salmon","latin-name":"Salmo salar","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7600\/16855656081_86ceb401e0_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Atlantic Salmon has a MOVE of 2 and can feed on ZOOPLANKTON.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Human activities (overfishing and habitat change) have heavily damaged salmon populations across their range.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by A.F. Lydon (1878)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"A.F. Lydon (1878)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"fresh-water","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Atlantic_salmon","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/206776\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25119","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDCECE-fresh-water-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#ddcece","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/three-spined-stickleback-2\/","excerpt":"The three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus,[1] is a fish native to most inland coastal waters north of 30\u00b0N. It has long been a subject of scientific study for many reasons. It shows great morphological variation throughout its range, ideal for questions about evolution and population genetics. Most populations are anadromous (they live in seawater but breed […]","name-size":"","title":"Three-Spined Stickleback","title-attr":"Three-Spined Stickleback","latin-name":"Gasterosteus aculeatus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8599\/16830833136_92ce72bc98_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Actinopterygii<\/a>","point-score":"9","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Three-Spined Stickleback has a MOVE of 2 and feeds on ZOOPLANKTON.
    \nFact:<\/strong> There is evidence that shows the existence of cooperative behaviour among three-spined sticklebacks.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool","temperature-data":["cold","cool"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by A.F. Lydon<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"A.F. Lydon","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"fresh-water","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Three-spined_stickleback","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/223856\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25118","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E8E8-grasslands-forest-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e8e8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/yellow-iris\/","excerpt":"Iris pseudacorus (yellow flag, yellow iris, water flag) is a species in the genus Iris, of the family Iridaceae. It is native to Europe, western Asia and northwest Africa. Its specific epithet, meaning “false acorus,” refers to the similarity of its leaves to those of Acorus calamus, as they have a prominently veined mid-rib and […]","name-size":"","title":"Yellow Iris","title-attr":"Yellow Iris","latin-name":"Iris pseudacorus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7282\/16830831936_deed8a6b62_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Monocots<\/a>","point-score":"2","card-text":"

    Fact:<\/strong> This plant has been used as a form of water treatment since it has the ability to take up heavy metals through its roots.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by O.W. Thome (1903)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"O.W. Thome (1903)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Iris_pseudacorus","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/491653\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25117","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDD9D2-grasslands-forest-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ddd9d2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/great-crested-newt\/","excerpt":"The northern crested newt, also known as the great crested newt or warty newt (Triturus cristatus) is anewt in the family Salamandridae, found across Europe and parts of Asia. It is a relatively large species. Females can measure up to 16\u00a0cm and are larger than males, which measure 14 to 15\u00a0cm long.[2] These newts have […]","name-size":"","title":"Great Crested Newt","title-attr":"Great Crested Newt","latin-name":"Triturus cristatus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8678\/16856691305_b176895bcc_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Amphibia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Great Crested Newt has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> In England, Wales and Scotland, it is a protected species under Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by George Sowerby (1857)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"George Sowerby (1857)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Northern_crested_newt","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1018157\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25116","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDD5-grasslands-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#ededd5","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-frog\/","excerpt":"The common frog (Rana temporaria), also known as the European common frog, European common brown frog, or European grass frog, is a semi-aquatic amphibian of the family Ranidae, found throughout much of Europe as far north as Scandinavia and as far east as the Urals, except for most of Iberia, southern Italy, and the southern […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Frog","title-attr":"Common Frog","latin-name":"Rana temporaria","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8572\/16649390197_96bde2c6bc_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Amphibia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> Common Frog has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> In some places, this frog may be trapped under ice for up to 9 months, but studies have shown that they may still be relatively active at temperatures close to freezing.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by M.C. Cooke (1893)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"M.C. Cooke (1893)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"fresh-water","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Common_frog","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/331133\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25085","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDDE-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#ededde","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/common-octopus\/","excerpt":"The common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) is the most studied of all octopus species. O. vulgaris is considered cosmopolitan. Global[1] in its range in the eastern Atlantic extends from theMediterranean Sea and the southern coast of England to at least Senegal in Africa. It also occurs off theAzores, Canary Islands, and Cape Verde Islands.[2] The species […]","name-size":"","title":"Common Octopus","title-attr":"Common Octopus","latin-name":"Octopus vulgaris","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7620\/16669940239_2e97081471_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Mollusca<\/a>, Cephalopoda<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Common Octopus has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Common Octopus is able to colour blend with its surroundings.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by James Sowerby (1806)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"James Sowerby (1806)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"ocean","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Common_octopus","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25084","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EFEEE6-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#efeee6","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/sperm-whale\/","excerpt":"The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), or cachalot, is the largest of the toothed whales and the largest toothed predator. It is the only living member of genus Physeter, and one of three extant species in the sperm whale family, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale of the genus Kogia. Mature males […]","name-size":"","title":"Sperm Whale","title-attr":"Sperm Whale","latin-name":"Physeter macrocephalus","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"9","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8735\/16856070375_000a9196ee_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Sperm Whale has a MOVE of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> From the early 18th century through the late 20th, the species was a prime target of whalers. The head of the whale contains a liquid wax known as spermaceti, from which the whale derives its name.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by H.J. Johnson (1880)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"H.J. Johnson (1880)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"ocean","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Sperm_whale","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/328547\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25083","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DADFE5-grasslands-fresh-water-fresh-water-1.png","card-colour":"#dadfe5","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/mute-swan-2\/","excerpt":"The mute swan (Cygnus olor) is a species of swan, and thus a member of the waterfowl family Anatidae. It is native to much of Europe and Asia, and (as a rare winter visitor) the far north of Africa. It is also anintroduced species in North America, Australasia and southern Africa. The name ‘mute’ derives […]","name-size":"","title":"Mute Swan","title-attr":"Mute Swan","latin-name":"Cygnus olor","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7589\/16830213536_d9e7f20b78_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"4","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Mute Swan has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> The Mute Swan is one of the heaviest flying birds, with males (known as cobs) averaging about 24 to 26lbs.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by W.F. Kirby (1889)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"W.F. Kirby (1889)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"fresh-water","habitat-3":"fresh-water","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Mute_swan","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/913227\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25082","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EAEFE6-grasslands-forest-urban-1.png","card-colour":"#eaefe6","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/green-woodpecker-2\/","excerpt":"The European green woodpecker (Picus viridis) is a member of the woodpecker family Picidae. There are four subspecies and it occurs in most parts of Europe and in western Asia. All have green upperparts, paler yellowish underparts, a red crown and moustachial stripe which has a red centre in males but is all black in […]","name-size":"","title":"Green Woodpecker","title-attr":"Green Woodpecker","latin-name":"Picus viridis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8626\/16668690510_e5a5f8c2e8_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Aves<\/a>","point-score":"7","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> The Green Woodpecker has a FLIGHT of 2.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Like other woodpeckers, the Green Woodpecker’s tongue is long (10cm) and has to be curled around its skull.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by W. Swaysland (1883)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"W. Swaysland (1883)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"grasslands","habitat-2":"forest","habitat-3":"urban","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/European_green_woodpecker","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1177650\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25081","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-EDEDE1-urban-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#edede1","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/human-3\/","excerpt":"Modern humans (Homo sapiens or Homo sapiens sapiens) are the only extantmembers of the homininclade, a branch of great apes characterized by erect postureand bipedal locomotion; manual dexterity and increased tool use; and a general trend toward larger, more complex brains and societies.[3][4] Early hominids, such as theaustralopithecines whose brains and anatomy are in many […]","name-size":"","title":"Human","title-attr":"Human","latin-name":"Homo sapiens","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8668\/16830214296_73806bc198_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This Human has a MOVE of 2. Can be played next to any TERRAIN.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Although an omnivore, this card can only be played next to a SPECIES card that represents food that the player would actually eat.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Unknown (1876-78)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Unknown (1876-78)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"urban","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Human","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/327955\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25080","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E2E2E2-urban-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#e2e2e2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/human-2\/","excerpt":"Modern humans (Homo sapiens or Homo sapiens sapiens) are the only extant members of the homininclade, a branch of great apes characterized by erect posture and bipedal locomotion; manual dexterity and increased tool use; and a general trend toward larger, more complex brains and societies.[3][4] Early hominids, such as the australopithecines whose brains and anatomy […]","name-size":"","title":"Human","title-attr":"Human","latin-name":"Homo sapiens","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"8","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8694\/16668485058_5314d6f4b1_o_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This Human has a MOVE of 2. Can be played next to any TERRAIN.
    \nFact:<\/strong> Although an omnivore, this card can only be played next to a SPECIES card that represents food that the player would actually eat.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm, hot","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm","hot"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by A.B. Strong (1855)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"A.B. Strong (1855)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"urban","habitat-2":"grasslands","habitat-3":"forest","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Human","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/327955\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"25079","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E2E2E2-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#e2e2e2","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/harbour-seal\/","excerpt":"The harbor (or harbour) seal (Phoca vitulina), also known as the common seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines of the Northern Hemisphere. The most widely distributed species ofpinniped (walruses, eared seals, and true seals), they are found in coastal waters of the northern Atlanticand Pacific oceans, the Baltic and […]","name-size":"","title":"Harbour Seal","title-attr":"Harbour Seal","latin-name":"Phoca vitulina","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"7","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm9.staticflickr.com\/8751\/16854909721_5a58864850_b_d.jpg","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Mammalia<\/a>","point-score":"8","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This Harbour Seal has a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Fact:<\/strong> Seals in the UK are protected by the 1970 Conservation of Seals Act, which probihits most forms of killing.<\/p>\n","temperature":"cold, cool, warm","temperature-data":["cold","cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    Graphic by Richard Lydekker (1886)<\/em><\/span><\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"Richard Lydekker (1886)","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"ocean","habitat-2":"ocean","habitat-3":"ocean","wiki-link":"
  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Harbor_seal","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/328629\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24913","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-FFFFFF-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ffffff","border-colour":"#bcccdd","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/gsa-model-organisms-deck\/","excerpt":"RELEVANT LINKS Download free printable full deck (55Mb pdf). Download Rules sheet only (2.6Mb pdf). See individual cards. Buy high quality deck (at revenue neutral prices). GSA Homepage Deck Announcement – see this post and this post for details. NOTES: This deck was created in an attempt to represent (as much as possible) the diverse […]","name-size":"","title":"GSA MODEL ORGANISMS DECK","title-attr":"GSA MODEL ORGANISMS DECK","latin-name":".","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7699\/27861005302_74f933be8f_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Home<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    CARDS<\/a> | RULES<\/a> | GSA HOME<\/a><\/p>\n

    .<\/font><\/p>\n

    The first game to use a “science process” game mechanic to explore process of science ideas. In this case, a closer look at the use of model organisms<\/a><\/i> – – in genetic research.<\/p>\n<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

    <\/div>","graphic-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"photo-credit":"\n\t\t
    <\/div>","photo-credit-data":{"name":"","url":""},"habitat-1":"0","habitat-2":"0","habitat-3":"0","wiki-link":"","wiki-url":"","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24912","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F7DBBE-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#f7dbbe","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/ciliates\/","excerpt":"The ciliates are a group of protozoans characterized by the presence of hair-like organelles called cilia, which are identical in structure to eukaryotic flagella, but in general shorter and present in much larger numbers, with a differentundulating pattern than flagella. Cilia occur in all members of the group (although the peculiar Suctoria only have them […]","name-size":"","title":"Ciliates","title-attr":"Ciliates","latin-name":"Tetrahymena (genus)","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"2","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7101\/27193066394_d7ac866a09_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Chromalveolata<\/a>, Ciliophora<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/b> Ciliates have a MOVE of 1<\/p>\n

    These unicellular protists use hair-like cilia for locomotion and feeding. They are important to biomedical research and have contributed to our understanding of many cellular and biochemical processes.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"http:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Ciliate","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/4666\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24908","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C4EDC7-ocean-ocean-ocean-1.png","card-colour":"#c4edc7","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/frog\/","excerpt":"Frogs are a diverse and largely carnivorous group of short-bodied, tailless amphibians composing the order Anura(Ancient Greek an-, without + oura, tail). The oldest fossil “proto-frog” appeared in the early Triassic of Madagascar, but molecular clock dating suggests their origins may extend further back to the Permian, 265 million years ago. Frogs are widely distributed, […]","name-size":"","title":"Frog","title-attr":"Frog","latin-name":"Xenopus laevis \/ tropicalis","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"5","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7456\/27770652526_5eae07da16_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Chordata<\/a>, Amphibia<\/a>","point-score":"3","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> This frog has a MOVE of 2.<\/p>\n

    Commonly known as the “clawed frog”, this amphibian’s large embryos and eggs are easy to obtain and manipulate for medical and developmental research.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Frog","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/1038993\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24906","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-BDEDD9-grasslands-urban-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#bdedd9","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/c-elegans\/","excerpt":"Caenorhabditis elegans (\/\u02ccse\u026ano\u028ar\u00e6b\u02c8da\u026at\u0259s \u02c8\u025bl\u0259\u0261\u00e6nz\/[2]) is a free-living (not parasitic), transparentnematode (roundworm), about 1\u00a0mm in length,[3] that lives in temperate soil environments. The name is a blend of the Greek caeno- (recent), rhabditis (rod-like)[4] and Latin elegans (elegant). In 1900, Maupasinitially named it Rhabditides elegans, Osche placed it in the subgenus Caenorhabditis in 1952, and in […]","name-size":"","title":"C. elegans","title-attr":"C. elegans","latin-name":"Caenorhabditis elegans","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"3","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7614\/27193066184_e87e9e871d_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Animalia<\/a>, Nematoda<\/a>, Chromadorea<\/a>","point-score":"5","card-text":"

    Play:<\/strong> C. elegans<\/i> has a MOVE of 1. It eats bacteria & rotting plants.<\/p>\n

    This transparent nematode (roundworm), the 1st sequenced multicellular organism, is no more than 1 mm in length, making it easy to examine for inherited traits during genetic studies.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Caenorhabditis_elegans","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/403869\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24905","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-C0E2BE-urban-grasslands-forest-1.png","card-colour":"#c0e2be","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/arabidopsis\/","excerpt":"Arabidopsis (rockcress) is a genus in the family Brassicaceae. They are small flowering plants related to cabbageand mustard. This genus is of great interest since it contains thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), one of the model organisms used for studying plant biology and the first plant to have its entire genome sequenced. Changes in thale cress […]","name-size":"","title":"Arabidopsis","title-attr":"Arabidopsis","latin-name":"Arabidopsis thaliana","scale":"\"Scale","scale-number":"6","food-chain":"\"Diat:","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7392\/27526908530_69bea0af4d_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Plantae<\/a>, Angiosperms<\/a>, Eudicots<\/a>","point-score":"1","card-text":"

    This small flowering plant from the mustard family is an ideal model organism because of its short generation time, large yield, and small genome. It was the first plant to have it’s entire genome sequenced. <\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"cool, warm","temperature-data":["cool","warm"],"graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Arabidopsis","eol-link":"
  • EOL<\/a>
  • ","eol-url":"http:\/\/eol.org\/pages\/583954\/overview","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"28551","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DDDDDD-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#dddddd","border-colour":"#000000","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/join-a-society-2\/","excerpt":"The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is a scholarly membership society of more than 5,500 genetics researchers and educators, established in 1931. The Society was formed from the reorganization of the Joint Genetics Sections of the American Society of Zoologists and the Botanical Society of America.[3] GSA members conduct fundamental and applied research using a […]","name-size":"","title":"Join A Society","title-attr":"Join A Society","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7122\/27805195225_61758d39a8_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    The GSA has more than 5500 members worldwide, who work to advance the field of genetics to deepen our understanding of the living world.<\/i><\/p>\n

    Play:<\/b> On your turn, use this card to look at the top 3 resource pile cards. Here, you may take 1, & return the other 2 to the top of the pile.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Genetics_Society_of_America","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24904","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-CEE6E8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#cee6e8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/grant-approved-2\/","excerpt":"Grants are non-repayable funds or products disbursed by one party (grant makers), often a government department, corporation, foundation or trust, to a recipient, often (but not always) a nonprofit entity, educational institution, business or an individual. In order to receive a grant, some form of “Grant Writing” often referred to as either a proposal or […]","name-size":"","title":"Grant Approved","title-attr":"Grant Approved","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7304\/27193066464_4839fc5bc6_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    You just got funded!<\/strong><\/p>\n

    <\/br><\/p>\n

    Play: <\/strong>You may use this card in place of a SPECIES<\/strong> card for one project. You do not have to specify which species it is being used for until the project is complete.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Grant_(money)","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24903","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E8E6C0-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#e8e6c0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/human-error\/","excerpt":"Human error has been cited as a primary cause or contributing factor in disasters and accidents in industries as diverse as nuclear power (e.g., the Three Mile Island accident), aviation (see pilot error), space exploration (e.g., the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster and Space Shuttle Columbia disaster), and medicine (see medical error). Prevention of human error […]","name-size":"","title":"Human Error!","title-attr":"Human Error!","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7228\/27770652846_da719feae4_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Something isn’t working! Perhaps your samples are contaminated, you lost your data, or forgot to feed your organism again.<\/strong><\/p>\n

    Play:\u00a0<\/strong>Place face up on another players species card. \u00a0The covered species card is immediately placed in the burn pile along with this card.<\/p>\n

    <\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Human_error","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24902","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-B2E4E8-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#b2e4e8","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/grant-approved\/","excerpt":"Grants are non-repayable funds or products disbursed by one party (grant makers), often a government department, corporation, foundation or trust, to a recipient, often (but not always) a nonprofit entity, educational institution, business or an individual. In order to receive a grant, some form of “Grant Writing” often referred to as either a proposal or […]","name-size":"","title":"Grant Approved","title-attr":"Grant Approved","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7342\/27193066414_d03fd19a79_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    You just got funded! <\/strong><\/p>\n

    <\/br><\/p>\n

    Play: <\/strong>You may use this card in place of a RESEARCH TECHNIQUE<\/strong> card for one project. You do not have to specify which technique it is being used for until the project is complete.  <\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Grant_(money)","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24901","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-FFFFFF-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ffffff","border-colour":"#efc2c2","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/increase-sample-size\/","excerpt":"Sample size determination is the act of choosing the number of observations or replicates to include in a statistical sample. The sample size is an important feature of any empirical study in which the goal is to make inferences about a population from a sample. In practice, the sample size used in a study is […]","name-size":"","title":"Increase Sample Size","title-attr":"Increase Sample Size","latin-name":"MANDATORY PROJECT","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7227\/27729861861_0e757bc8da_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Mandatory Project<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Your reviewers are not convinced by your results and want to increase your sample size! Collect 2 SPECIES cards in the same category.<\/strong>\n<\/p>\n

    Play:<\/strong> Give this card to another player. No points for completing. Minus 2 points for NOT completing. Cannot be involved in collaborations.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Sample_size_determination","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24900","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-FFFFFF-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#ffffff","border-colour":"#efc2c2","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/lab-preparations\/","excerpt":"A laboratory (\/l\u0259\u02c8b\u0252r\u0259t\u0259ri\/ or \/\u02c8l\u00e6b\u0259r\u0259t\u0254\u02d0ri\/; informally, lab) is a facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific or technological research, experiments, and measurement may be performed. Laboratories used for scientific research take many forms because of the differing requirements of specialists in the various fields of science and engineering. A physics laboratory might contain a […]","name-size":"","title":"Lab Preparations","title-attr":"Lab Preparations","latin-name":"MANDATORY PROJECT","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7383\/27805195455_862f2a18ab_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Mandatory Project<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Before starting a molecular genetics project, you must prepare your reagents and optimize your protocol!<\/p>\n

    <\/strong><\/p>\n

    <\/br><\/p>\n

    Play:\u00a0<\/strong>Give to another player. No points for completing. -2<\/strong> points if NOT completed. Cannot be collaborated with.<\/p>\n<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Laboratory","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24899","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-E1F4D0-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#e1f4d0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/resource-donation\/","excerpt":"A donation is a gift given by physical or legal persons, typically for charitable purposes and\/or to benefit a cause. A donation may take various forms, including cash offering, services, new or used goods including clothing, toys, food, and vehicles. It also may consist of emergency, relief or humanitarian aid items, development aid support, and […]","name-size":"","title":"Resource Donation","title-attr":"Resource Donation","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7386\/27805195355_27f38905df_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    A neighbouring lab has a resource you want, and generously offers it to you!<\/strong><\/p>\n

    <\/br><\/p>\n

    Play: <\/strong>Take a resouce from another player’s project and place it in your hand.\u00a0Place this card in the burn pile after use.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Donation","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24897","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-DEF4EE-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#def4ee","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/swap-projects\/","excerpt":"In contemporary business and science a project is a collaborative enterprise, involving research or design, that is carefully planned[by whom?] to achieve a particular aim.[1] One can also define a project as a set of interrelated tasks to be executed over a fixed period and within certain cost and other limitations.[2] Projects can be further […]","name-size":"","title":"Swap Projects!","title-attr":"Swap Projects!","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7412\/27805195215_eabc190a12_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    You have the opportunity to exchange ideas and expertise with another scientist.<\/strong><\/p>\n

    Play: <\/strong>Choose a player and take one of their projects and associated resources. Give them one of your projects and associated resources. <\/p>\n

    May not be used on collaborative or mandatory projects. <\/em><\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Project","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"},{"id":"24896","background":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/wp-content\/themes\/phylo\/img\/generated-card-images\/br-F2D9D0-0-0-0-1.png","card-colour":"#f2d9d0","border-colour":"#212121","permalink":"http:\/\/phylogame.org\/cards\/lose-funding\/","excerpt":"Funding is the act of providing financial resources, usually in the form of money, or other values such as effort or time, to finance a need, program, and project, usually by an organisation or government. Generally, this word is used when a firm uses its internal reserves to satisfy its necessity for cash, while the […]","name-size":"","title":"Lose Funding!","title-attr":"Lose Funding!","latin-name":"Modifier Card","scale":"","scale-number":"0","food-chain":"","graphic":"https:\/\/farm8.staticflickr.com\/7452\/27193066614_52c92660ea_o_d.png","photo":"","classification":"Modifier Card<\/a>","point-score":"","card-text":"

    Budget cuts create project setbacks. Noooo!<\/strong><\/p>\n

    <\/br><\/p>\n

    Play:\u00a0<\/strong>Place on top of another player’s RESEARCH TECHNIQUE<\/strong>\u00a0card. The card affected is immediately removed and placed in the burn pile along with this card.<\/p>\n

    GSA deck<\/a><\/p>\n","temperature":"","temperature-data":"","graphic-credit":"\n\t\t

  • Wiki<\/a>
  • ","wiki-url":"https:\/\/en.wikipedia.org\/wiki\/Funding","eol-link":"","eol-url":"","photo-licence":"<\/a>","graphic-licence":"<\/a>"}]