Humpback Whale

Megaptera Novaeangliae
Scale 9 Diat: omnivore , Hierachy 3
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

5 POINTS

PLAY: The Acorn Barnacle is a suspension feeder, extracting food from the water.
FACT: Acorn Barnacle produce a brown glue that fastens it to a hard surface.

cool, warm
Graphic by Bita Mojtahedzadehocean.org/
The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 m (39–52 ft) and weigh around 25–30 metric tons (28–33 short tons). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is known for breaching and other distinctive surface behaviors, making it popular with whale watchers. Males produce a […] read more

Pacific Littleneck Clam

Leukoma staminea
Scale 4 Diat: carbon-macromolecules , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

3 POINTS

PLAY: LittleNeck Clam has a MOVE of 1. This clam is a filter feeder, and can be considered prey for carnivores.
FACT: The Pacific Littleneck Clam’s concentric rings can be used to determine their age.

cool, warm
Graphic by Bita Mojtahedzadehocean.org/
Leukoma staminea, commonly known as the Pacific littleneck clam, the littleneck clam, the rock cockle, the hardshell clam, the Tomales Bay cockle, the rock clam or the ribbed carpet shell,[2] is a species of bivalve molluscin the family Veneridae.[3] This species of mollusc was exploited by early humans in North America; for example, the Chumash peoples of Central California harvested these clams in Morro Bay approximately 1,000 years ago,[4] and the distinctive shells form middens near their settlements.[5] Like […] read more

Acorn Barnacle

Semibalanus balanoides
Scale 4 Diat: carbon-macromolecules , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

2 POINTS

PLAY: The Acorn Barnacle is a suspension feeder, extracting food from the water.
FACT: Acorn Barnacle produce a brown glue that fastens it to a hard surface.

cool, warm
Graphic by Bita Mojtahedzadehocean.org/
Semibalanus balanoides is a common and widespread boreo–arctic species of acorn barnacle. It is common on rocks and other substrates in the intertidal zone of north-western Europe and both coasts of North America. Adult S. balanoides grow up to 15 millimetres (0.6 in) in diameter, and are sessile, living attached to rocks and other solid substrates. They have six greyish wall plates surrounding a diamond-shaped operculum.[2][3] The base of the shell is membranous in Semibalanus, unlike […] read more

European Saber-Toothed Cat

Homotherium latidens
Scale 7 Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

EXTINCT | 8 POINTS

PLAY: Move of 2. The card may be put next to all sizes of herbivores.
FACT: The European saber-toothed cats are often wrongly called “saber-toothed tigers”. Saber-toothed cats belong to their own genus.

cool
Graphic by Thøgersen&Stoubywww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Homotherium (also known as the scimitar-toothed cat or scimitar cat)[2] is an extinctgenus of machairodontine saber-toothed cats,[3] often termed scimitar-toothed cats, that inhabited North America, South America, Eurasia, and Africa during the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs (4 mya – 12,000 years ago), existing for approximately 4 million years.[1][4] It first became extinct in Africa some 1.5 million years ago. In Eurasia it survived until about 30,000 years ago.[5] In South America it is only known from a few remains in the northern […] read more

Woolly Mammoth

Mammuthus primigenius
Scale 9 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2
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EXTINCT | 4 POINTS

PLAY: Move of 1
FACT: The mammoth’s tusks grow throughout life of the mammoth. By counting the growth rings at the thickest point, one can find out how old the mammoth was. They grew about 10 to 20 cm each year.

cold, cool
Graphic by Thøgersen&Stoubywww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) is an extinct species of mammoththat lived during the Pleistocene epoch, and was one of the last in a line of mammoth species, beginning with Mammuthus subplanifrons in the early Pliocene. The woolly mammoth diverged from the steppe mammoth about 400,000 years ago in East Asia. Its closest extant relative is the Asian elephant. The appearance and behaviour of this species […] read more

Woolly Rhino

Coelodonta antiquitatis
Scale 9 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2
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EXTINCT | 4 POINTS

PLAY: Move of 1

FACT: When horns from woolly rhinos were found in Russia during the 19th century, many believed they were the claws of giant birds, because they were found apart from the rest of the body.

cold, cool
Graphic by Thøgersen&Stoubywww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
The woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) is an extinct species of rhinocerosthat was common throughout Europe and northern Asia[2] during the Pleistoceneepoch and survived the last glacial period. The genus name Coelodonta means “cavity tooth”. The woolly rhinoceros was a member of the Pleistocene megafauna. The appearance of woolly rhinos is known from mummified individuals from Siberia as well as cave paintings.[4] An adult woolly rhinoceros was typically around 3 to 3.8 […] read more