Aeronaut Spider

Parasteatoda tepidariorum
Scale 4 Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3
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6 POINTS

Play: These spiders have a FLIGHT of 2.
“How inexplicable is the cause which induces these small insects, as it now appears in both hemispheres, to undertake their aerial excursions.” ~Darwin (Oct 31, 1832)

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Graphic by Diana Sudykawww.dianasudyka.com
Ballooning, sometimes called kiting, is a behaviour in which spiders and some other invertebrates use air-borne dispersal to move between locations.[1][2] A spider (usually limited to individuals of a small species), or spiderling after hatching,[3] will climb as high as it can, stand on raised legs with its abdomen pointed upwards (“tiptoeing”),[4] and then release […] read more

Dragonfly

Anisoptera Infraorder
Scale 4 Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3
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7 POINTS

Play: The Dragonfly has a FLIGHT of 2.

Fact: In general, large dragonflies have a maximum speed of 10 to 15 metres per second (22 to 34 mph.)

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Graphic by Caspar & Merian (1718)
A dragonfly is an insect belonging to the suborder Anisoptera (from Greek ανισος anisos, “uneven” + πτερος pteros, “wings”, because the hindwing is broader than the forewing). It is characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, sometimes with coloured patches, and an elongated body. Dragonflies can be mistaken for the related […] read more

Clouded Yellow

Colias genus
Scale 4 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2

3 POINTS

Play: Clouded Yellows have a FLIGHT of 2, and need to feed off a flowering PLANTAE species.
Fact: This genus occurs throughout the Northern hemisphere, and is also found in South America, Africa, China and India.

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Colias is a genus of butterflies in the family Pieridae. They are usually called clouded yellows; the North American name “sulphurs” is elsewhere used for Coliadinae in general. The closest living relative is the genusZerene,[4] which is sometimes included in Colias. This genus occurs throughout the Holarctic, including the arctic regions. They are also found […] read more

European Garden Spider

Araneus diadematus
Scale 4 Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3
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7 POINTS

Play: The European Spider has a MOVE of 1.

Fact: The third pair of legs the garden spiders are specialized for assisting in the spinning of orb webs.

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Graphic by Emst Haeckel (1904)
“Cross spider” redirects here. For spiders noted for their web markings (stabilimenta), see Argiope (spider). The spider species Araneus diadematus is commonly called the European garden spider,diadem spider, cross spider, or crowned orb weaver. It is an orb-weaver spider found inEurope and North America. (From Wikipedia, March 2015) read more

Fruit Fly

Drosophila melanogaster
Scale 5 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2
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3 POINTS

Play: This fly has a FLIGHT of 2.

This tiny fly has been a favourite model organism among geneticists for over 100 years, due to it’s short life cycle, prolific reproduction, the ease of mutation, and the ease of identifying inherited traits.

GSA deck

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Graphic by Amy Dalealsdale.deviantart.com
Drosophila melanogaster is a species of fly (the taxonomic order Diptera) in the familyDrosophilidae. The species is known generally as the common fruit fly or vinegar fly. Starting with Charles W. Woodworth‘s proposal of the use of this species as a model organism, D. melanogaster continues to be widely used for biological research in studies […] read more

Pharaoh cicada

Magicicada septendecim
Scale 4 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2

4 POINTS

• Magicicada septendecim has a FLIGHT of 2

Magicicada septendecim is also sometimes known as the 17 year locust

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Graphic by Darren Hopeswww.darrenhopes.com
Magicicada septendecim, sometimes called the Pharaoh cicada or the 17 year locust, is native to Canada and the United Statesand is the largest and most northern species of periodical cicada with a 17-year life cycle.[2] Accounts of the species’ life cycle cite reports of fifteen- to seventeen-year recurrences of enormous numbers of noisy emergent cicadas that people had written as early as 1737.[3][4] Pehr […] read more