Dwarf Willow

Salix polaris
Scale 5 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

2 POINTS

FACT: One of the worlds smallest willows. They can reach a very high age. The willow almost crawls along the ground to avoid direct cold.

cold, cool
Graphic by Thøgersen&Stouby | Bjoertvedtwww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Salix polaris, the polar willow, is a species of willow with a circumpolar distribution in the high arctic tundra, extending north to the limits of land, and south of the Arctic in the mountains of Norway, the northern Ural Mountains, the northern Altay Mountains, Kamchatka, and British Columbia, Canada.[1][2][3][4] One of the smallest willows in the world, it is a prostrate, creeping dwarf shrub, only 2–9 cm (0.79–3.54 in) high, and […] read more

Mountain Avens

Dryas octopetala
Scale 5 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

2 POINTS

FACT: A frugal plant. It takes 10 years from seed germination until it blossoms.

cold, cool
Graphic by Thøgersen&Stouby | Muriel Bendelwww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Dryas octopetala (common names include mountain avens,[1] eightpetal mountain-avens, white dryas, and white dryad) is an Arctic–alpine flowering plant in the familyRosaceae. It is a small prostrate evergreen subshrub forming large colonies. The specific epithet octopetala derives from the Greek octo (eight) and petalon (petal), referring to the eight petals of the flower, an unusual number in the Rosaceae, where five is the normal number. However, flowers with up to 16 petals also occur naturally. Dryas octopetala has […] read more

Sphagnum Moss

Sphagnum spp.
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

3 POINTS

Fact: Sphagnum moss shapes the boreal forest by absorbing water and producing acid, which causes the development of peat bogs.

cold, cool
Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Sphagnum is a genus of approximately 380 accepted species[2] of mosses, commonly known as peat moss. Accumulations of Sphagnum can store water, since both living and dead plants can hold large quantities of water inside their cells; plants may hold 16–26 times as much water as their dry weight, depending on the species.[3] The empty […] read more

Sedge Species

Carex spp.
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

2 POINTS

Fact: Sedges can be confused with grasses, but are found in wet areas and have three-sided stems: remember “Sedges have edges”.

cold, cool
Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Carex is a vast genus of almost 2,000 species[2] of grassy plants in the family Cyperaceae, commonly known as sedges (or seg, in older books). Other members of the Cyperaceae family are also called sedges, however those of genus Carex may be called “true” sedges, and it is the most species-rich genus in the family. […] read more

Grass Species

Poaceae spp.
Scale 7 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

1 POINTS

Fact: There are > 100 grass species in the boreal forest, many of which have been introduced from Europe and are considered invasive weeds.

cold, cool
Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Poaceae or Gramineae is a large and nearly ubiquitous family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as grasses. Poaceae includes the cereal grasses, bamboos and the grasses of natural grassland and cultivated lawns (turf) and pasture. Grasses have stems that are hollow except at the nodes and narrow alternate leaves borne in two ranks. The lower […] read more

Willow Species

Salix spp.
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

2 POINTS

Fact: The many species of willow in the boreal forest often hybridize, making them notoriously difficult to identify.

cold, cool
Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Willows, also called sallows, and osiers, form the genus Salix, around 400 species[2] of deciduous trees and shrubs, found primarily on moist soils in cold and temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Most species are known as willow, but some narrow-leaved shrub species are called osier, and some broader-leaved species are referred to as sallow […] read more