Phytoplankton

Multiple Orders
Scale 2 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

PLAY: Phytoplankton has a MOVE of 1
FACT: Phytoplankton are the main source of food for almost all fish.

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Graphic by Bita Mojtahedzadehocean.org/
Phytoplankton /ˌfaɪtoʊˈplæŋktən/ are the autotrophic (self-feeding) components of the plankton community and a key part of oceans, seas and freshwater basin ecosystems. The name comes from the Greek words φυτόν (phyton), meaning “plant“, and πλαγκτός (planktos), meaning “wanderer” or “drifter”.[1] Most phytoplankton are too small to be individually seen with the unaided eye. However, when present in high enough numbers, some varieties may be noticeable as […] read more

Dark Sea Lettuce

Ulvaria Obscura
Scale 5 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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1 POINTS

FACT: As a type of algae, this Dark Sea Lettuce is often found on beaches along the West Coast.

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Graphic by Bita Mojtahedzadehocean.org/
Ulvaria obscura is an intertidal and subtidal benthic marine algae found in temperate and Arctic ocean waters around the world.[1][2] Ulvaria obscura is a common marine algae, typically identified in algal blooms referred to as “Green Tides”.[3][4] The species is distinct in its ability to produce the neurotransmitter dopamine as a herbivore defense mechanism.[5][6] The species has a wide tolerance to various growth conditions, surviving temperatures between 5-29 °C, salinities from freshwater to […] read more

Arctic Poppy

Papaver radicatum
Scale 5 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

FACT: The flowers of the Arctic poppy fol- lows the sun’s movement across the sky. In this way it increases the temperature inside the flower creating an attractive microclimate for insects seeking warmth.

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Graphic by Thøgersen&Stouby | Berlandwww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Papaver radicatum is a species of poppy known by the common names Arctic poppy, rooted poppy, and yellow poppy. It is circumpolar in distribution and grows in arctic and alpine zones in Europe, North America, and Asia.[2][3] It grows at a latitude of 83°40’N on Kaffeklubben Island,[4] making it one of the northernmost plants in the world. It appears on the Coat […] read more

Purple Saxifrage

Saxifraga oppositifolia
Scale 5 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

FACT: It is a low-growing and mat-forming perennial plant. The flowers have a purple colour and are edible.

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Graphic by Thøgersen&Stouby | Ghislain118www.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Saxifraga oppositifolia, the purple saxifrage or purple mountain saxifrage,[1] is a species of edible plant that is very common all over the high Arctic and also some high mountainous areas further south, including northern Britain, the Alps and the Rocky Mountains. It is even known to grow on Kaffeklubben Island in north Greenland,[2] at 83°40’N, the most northerly plant locality in the world. It grows in all kinds of cold temperate to arctic […] read more

Goldenrod

Solidago virgaurea
Scale 6 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

FACT: This plant contains substances that makes one highly diuretic when ingested.

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Graphic by Thøgersen&Stouby | Isidre blancwww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Solidago virgaurea (European goldenrod or woundwort) is an herbaceous perennial plant of the family Asteraceae. It is widespread across most of Europe as well as North Africa and northern, central, and southwestern Asia (China, Russia, India, Turkey, Kazakhstan, etc.).[2][3][4] It is grown as a garden flower with many different cultivars. It flowers profusely in late summer. Solidago virgaurea is a perennial herb up to […] read more

Norway Spruce

Picea abies
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

FACT: During the Ice Age, few Norway spruces grew in ice-free areas. After the retreat of the ice, the trees spread to the milder tundra landscape.

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Graphic by Thøgersen&Stouby | Enforewww.thogersen-stouby.dk/
Picea abies, the Norway spruce,[3] is a species of spruce native to Northern, Central and Eastern Europe.[4] It has branchlets that typically hang downwards, and the largest cones of any spruce, 9–17 cm (3 1⁄2–6 3⁄4 in) long. It is very closely related to the Siberian spruce(Picea obovata), which replaces it east of the Ural Mountains, and with which it hybridises freely. The Norway spruce is widely planted for its wood, and […] read more