Red Osier Dogwood

Cornus stolonifera
Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: Dogwood in indicative of nutrient rich sites in the boreal forest and is preferred winter browse for many ungulates.

cold, cool
Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Cornus is a genus of about 30–60 species[Note 1] of woody plants in the family Cornaceae, commonly known as dogwoods, which can generally be distinguished by their blossoms, berries, and distinctive bark.[2] Most are deciduous trees or shrubs, but a few species are nearly herbaceous perennial subshrubs, and a few of the woody species are […] read more

Wild Rose

Rosa acicularis
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

Fact: Generally found in patches of sun, wild rose brings a sweet smell and splash of colour to the boreal forest when it blooms.

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Graphic by Elly Knighttwitter.com/ellycknight
Rosa acicularis, also known as the prickly wild rose, the prickly rose, the bristly rose, the wild rose and the Arctic rose, is a species of wild rose with a Holarctic distribution in northern regions of Asia,[2] Europe,[3] and North America. (From: Wikipedia, April 2017) read more

Wild Red Raspberry

Rubus idaeus
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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1 POINTS

Fact: Wild red raspberry is a biennial plant-it grows a flowerless stalk one year, which then produces fruit and dies the next year.

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Graphic by Elly Knighttwitter.com/ellycknight
Rubus idaeus (raspberry, also called red raspberry or occasionally as European raspberry to distinguish it from other raspberries) is a red-fruited species of Rubus native to Europe and northern Asia and commonly cultivated in other temperate regions.[2][3] A closely related plant in North America, sometimes regarded as the variety Rubus idaeus var. strigosus, is more […] read more

Common Blueberry

Vaccinium myrtilloides
Scale 7 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: Blueberry loves sandy, acidic areas and often grows near conifers because the trees’ fallen needles acidify the soil.

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Graphic by Elly Knighttwitter.com/ellycknight
Vaccinium myrtilloides is a shrub with common names including common blueberry, velvetleaf huckleberry, velvetleaf blueberry, Canadian blueberry, and sourtop blueberry.[2] It is common in much of North America, reported from all 10 Canadian province plus Nunavut and Northwest Territories, as well as from the northeastern and Great Lakes states in the United States. It is […] read more

Black Spruce

Picea mariana
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: Black spruce cones grow in a large clump at the top of the tree to protect them from wildfire-giving the trees a characteristic type.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Picea mariana (black spruce) is a North American species of spruce tree in the pine family. It is widespread across Canada, found in all 10 provinces and all 3 Arctic territories. Its range extends into northern parts of the United States: in Alaska, the Great Lakes region, and the upper Northeast. It is a frequent […] read more

White Spruce

Picea glauca
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: White spruce is a climax tree species in the boreal forest; it grows up in the understory shade, then takes over until the next fire.

cold, cool
Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Picea glauca, the white spruce,[2] is a species of spruce native to the northern temperate and boreal forests in North America. Picea glauca was originally native from central Alaska all through the east, across southern/central Canada to the Avalon Peninsula in Newfoundland. It now has become naturalized southward into the far northern United States border […] read more