Sphagnum Moss

Sphagnum spp.
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: Sphagnum moss shapes the boreal forest by absorbing water and producing acid, which causes the development of peat bogs.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Sphagnum is a genus of approximately 380 accepted species[2] of mosses, commonly known as peat moss. Accumulations of Sphagnum can store water, since both living and dead plants can hold large quantities of water inside their cells; plants may hold 16–26 times as much water as their dry weight, depending on the species.[3] The empty […] read more

Sedge Species

Carex spp.
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

Fact: Sedges can be confused with grasses, but are found in wet areas and have three-sided stems: remember “Sedges have edges”.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Carex is a vast genus of almost 2,000 species[2] of grassy plants in the family Cyperaceae, commonly known as sedges (or seg, in older books). Other members of the Cyperaceae family are also called sedges, however those of genus Carex may be called “true” sedges, and it is the most species-rich genus in the family. […] read more

Grass Species

Poaceae spp.
Scale 7 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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1 POINTS

Fact: There are > 100 grass species in the boreal forest, many of which have been introduced from Europe and are considered invasive weeds.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Poaceae or Gramineae is a large and nearly ubiquitous family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as grasses. Poaceae includes the cereal grasses, bamboos and the grasses of natural grassland and cultivated lawns (turf) and pasture. Grasses have stems that are hollow except at the nodes and narrow alternate leaves borne in two ranks. The lower […] read more

Willow Species

Salix spp.
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

Fact: The many species of willow in the boreal forest often hybridize, making them notoriously difficult to identify.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Willows, also called sallows, and osiers, form the genus Salix, around 400 species[2] of deciduous trees and shrubs, found primarily on moist soils in cold and temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Most species are known as willow, but some narrow-leaved shrub species are called osier, and some broader-leaved species are referred to as sallow […] read more

Red Osier Dogwood

Cornus stolonifera
Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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3 POINTS

Fact: Dogwood in indicative of nutrient rich sites in the boreal forest and is preferred winter browse for many ungulates.

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Graphic by Jonathan DeMoorwww.borealisimages.ca/
Cornus is a genus of about 30–60 species[Note 1] of woody plants in the family Cornaceae, commonly known as dogwoods, which can generally be distinguished by their blossoms, berries, and distinctive bark.[2] Most are deciduous trees or shrubs, but a few species are nearly herbaceous perennial subshrubs, and a few of the woody species are […] read more

Wild Rose

Rosa acicularis
Scale 8 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1
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2 POINTS

Fact: Generally found in patches of sun, wild rose brings a sweet smell and splash of colour to the boreal forest when it blooms.

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Graphic by Elly Knighttwitter.com/ellycknight
Rosa acicularis, also known as the prickly wild rose, the prickly rose, the bristly rose, the wild rose and the Arctic rose, is a species of wild rose with a Holarctic distribution in northern regions of Asia,[2] Europe,[3] and North America. (From: Wikipedia, April 2017) read more