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Pacific Dogwood

Cornus nuttallii
Scale 9 Diat: photosynthetic , Hierachy 1

5 POINTS

Cornus nuttallii has a SPREAD of 1 (requires POLLINATOR).

Cool, Warm
Graphic by Jesse Kemptondarkconofman.deviantart.com/
Photo by Paul Schultzwww.flickr.com/photos/pasfam/
The Pacific Dogwood, Cornus nuttallii (syn. Benthamidia nuttallii), is a species of dogwood native to western North America from lowlands of southern British Columbia to mountains of southern California. An inland population occurs in central Idaho. Cultivated examples are found as far north as the Queen Charlotte Islands. It is a small to medium-sized deciduous […] read more

Common Raven

Corvus corax
Scale 6 Diat: omnivore , Hierachy 3

2 POINTS

Corvus corax has a FLIGHT of 2.
Corvus corax can inhabit any landbased terrain
Corvus corax is thought to be highly intelligent.

Cold, Cool, Warm, Hot
Graphic by Jesse Kemptondarkconofman.deviantart.com/
The Common Raven (Corvus corax), also known as the Northern Raven, is a large, all-black passerine bird in the crow family. Found across the northern hemisphere, it is the most widely distributed of all corvids. There are eight known subspecies with little variation in appearance—although recent research has demonstrated significant genetic differences among populations from […] read more

Tiger Quoll

Dasyurus maculatus
Scale 6 Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3

9 POINTS

Dasyurus maculatus has a MOVE of 2.

“It is mainland Australia’s largest, and the worlds longest, carnivorous marsupial.”

Warm, Hot
Graphic by Leticia Rocha-Zivadinoviccreturfetur.com
Photo by Pierre Pouliquinwww.flickr.com/photos/pierre_pouliquin/
The tiger quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), also known as the spotted-tail quoll, the spotted quoll, the spotted-tailed dasyure or (erroneously) the tiger cat, is a carnivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is mainland Australia’s largest, and the worlds longest (the biggest is the Tasmanian Devil), carnivorous marsupial and it is considered an apex predator. The tiger […] read more

Spectacled Fruit Bat

Pteropus conspicillatus
Scale 6 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2

6 POINTS

Pteropus conspicillatus has a FLIGHT of 2.
Pteropus conspicillatus is a POLLINATOR and is a frugivore. They eat fruit.

Warm, Hot
Graphic by S B Kennedywingedsonar.deviantart.com
The Spectacled Flying-fox, Pteropus conspicillatus also known as the Spectacled Fruit Bat, lives in Australia’s north-eastern west regions of Queensland. It is also found in New Guinea and on the offshore islands including Woodlark Island, Alcester Island, Kiriwina, and Halmahera. The head and body length is 22–25 cm, forearm 16–18 cm, weight 400–1000 g. A […] read more

Western Sucker-footed Bat

Myzopoda schliemanni
Scale 6 Diat: carnivore , Hierachy 3
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

8 POINTS

Myzopoda schliemanni has a FLIGHT of 2.

Myzopoda schliemanni has “prominent suckers on its feet and thumbs.”

Warm, Hot
Graphic by S B Kennedywingedsonar.deviantart.com
The Western Sucker-footed Bat (Myzopoda schliemanni) is a Malagasy bat. Little is known about its habits, but they are assumed to be similar to those of the Madagascar Sucker-footed Bat.[1] The Western Sucker-footed Bat is 92-107 cm. (3-3.5 ft.) long. It has large ears, and prominent suckers on its feet and thumbs. It has buff-brown […] read more

Jamaican Fruit Bat

Artibeus jamaicensis
Scale 5 Diat: herbivore , Hierachy 2
Sorry, there is no photo available. If you have one, please submit here .

6 POINTSArtibeus jamaicensis has a FLIGHT of 2. • Artibeus jamaicensis is a POLLINATOR and is a frugivore. They eat fruit.

Warm, Hot
Graphic by S B Kennedywingedsonar.deviantart.com
The Jamaican, Common or Mexican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis) is a fruit bat native to Central and South America, as well as the Greater and many of the Lesser Antilles. It is also an uncommon resident of the Southern Bahamas. Its distinctive features include the absence of an external tail and a minimal, U-shaped interfemoral […] read more